[Vol. 93, Iss. 4] || The McKendree Review Crew

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Vol. 93, Iss. 4

Editors

Kimberly Bennett
Editor-in-Chief

Mindy Allen
Assistant Editor

Emily Lucia
Assistant Editor / Web Manager

Editing Team

Mindy Allen
Kimberly Bennett
Donna Bick*
Emily Lucia
Jenna Teetor*

In This Issue

Kaleigh Admire
Mindy Allen
Kimberly Bennett
Joseph Blasdel, Ph.D.
Elizabeth Crabtree
Humanities Division
Emily Lucia
McKendree University Athletics
Benjamin Richter
Jenna Teetor
Jessica Trout

* volunteer

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions,
which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in
Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at
701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Review Crew | Leave a comment

[Iss. 4] Leditors | A Letter from the Editors

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Hello everyone,

We hope everyone has had a great fall break so far! As of right now, there is nothing new in regards to the Review, but we will continue to ask the campus to submit articles to us. You do not have to be in journalism or English in order to write for us. We accept any sort of material; thank you to all of you who have submitted to us in the past and have a great weekend!

In this issue, you will learn more about the Center for Community Service, receive advice from Career Services, read about our Debate team and more!

Thanks,

The Editors

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Letters from the Editors | Leave a comment

McKendree’s Center for Community Service Invites Students to Participate in Activities

BY JESSICA TROUT
Program Coordinator for the Lyn Huxford Center for Community Service
Contributing Writer
Men's soccer team performing service with adaptive sports.  Credit: McKendree Athletics

Men’s soccer team performing service with adaptive sports.
Credit: McKendree Athletics

McKendree University’s Lyn Huxford Center for Community Service (CCS) is off to a running start.  Weekly programs are up and going five days a week with eight different programs serving the community.  CCS started the year with Into the Streets where about 500 people from McKendree’s community made their mark on 26 agencies. The CCS group completed their retreat at DuBois Center doing team courses and group activities. The athletic department seized an opportunity to work with Adaptive Sports Soccer Camp in Granite City, and the Art Club coordinated a Bowl-A-Thon in the Quad to benefit Empty Bowls, coming during Hunger and Homelessness Week.

Bowl-a-Thon Credit: McKendree's Art Club

Bowl-a-Thon
Credit: McKendree’s Art Club

To get involved with CCS, please come by Circuit Riders on Oct. 15 at 4 PM for Community

Fun and adventure. We meet on the steps of the bookstore for our weekly programs. Also, feel free to attend Trick or Treat for Canned Goods on Oct. 26 or contact CCS at mckcps@mckendree.edu for more information.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus, Campus Events, Campus Organization | Leave a comment

This Major is not for Me!

BY MINDY ALLEN
Assistant Editor
Credit: McKendree University Website

Credit: McKendree University Website

Do you remember the anxiety you felt before graduating high school when you were concerned with your future? It is possible you were still in the process of finding the perfect college, or maybe you were not sure what you wanted to do after college. Now, while you are attending classes at McKendree University, you may still be undecided about your major or may have last minute fears about your current major, but you are not alone. Many students change their majors during their college careers – and some even multiple times before graduating.

Whether you are a freshman or a junior planning to graduate in the next year, you may decide your major needs some tweaking or that you want to add an additional minor. Donna Bick, a nontraditional student whose original career path was English with a minor in creative writing decided to add Professional Writing as a minor during her senior year. She decided to stay at McKendree for at least another semester because she loves to learn.

“For me, though, the more I learn and take classes, the more I want to learn other things… If [students] change their major after three or four years of college, that does not surprise me,” Bick explains. “Some students feel compelled to go for the education that will bring in the money or are steered to occupations by their parents, but then after a few years, they realize they hate what they are studying and make a bold move and change their major, which I think is brave.”

For professional advice, Career Services, along with academic advisors, are the best people to contact when students have fears about changing their majors. Emily Lucia, a senior at McKendree who was also once an English major, decided to change her degree to Professional Writing immediately before her senior year. Lucia’s advises to other students “not over think your decision, and talk it over with your parents and advisors. They know best. But ultimately, pray about it (if you’re the praying type). There’s a sense of relief and a feeling of rightness when it’s all said and done.”

If you want to change your major, Career Services can help on an individual basis. Jennifer Pickerell, the director of Career Services, explains that graduate school is an option for some students: “It really depends on the major, the student and his or her financial situation, and if he or she has plans to go to graduate school after McKendree.  For example, if the student wants to pursue graduate school immediately after McKendree and can be accepted with their current major into the program of his or her choice, [then] they wouldn’t have to change majors.  They would then be able to pursue a different area of interest in graduate school instead.”

For students who are not interested in graduate school, as long as time allows, students can alter their majors by choosing similar career tracks. Sometimes, students may not realize that, even in their junior years, they have room to add minors, as Jennifer Pickerell of Career Services says: “Often a student can add a minor their junior year, and in fact I have seen that happen several times because they have more credits in a specific area than they realized they would have when beginning their studies.  Sometimes a student might find they can still get into an area of interest even if they don’t have that specific major, depending on the industry.”

College is about finding who you are and who you want to be before entering the workforce. Although choosing a major, deciding to change your major, or adding a minor may seem like ingredients for a stressful headache, it is just a part of being a college student. While you are attending McKendree University, take your time in finding yourself (and your future career) before you become you graduate and enter into the “real” world.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Advice, Articles, Campus, Features | Leave a comment

McKendree Gallery of the Art Promotes New Show: Submerge and Surface

BY BENJAMIN RICHTER
Contributing Writer
Crystal Vicars-Pugh Credit goes to its rightful owner.

Crystal Vicars-Pugh
Credit goes to its rightful owner.

The McKendree University Gallery of Art will be hosting its next show “Submerge and Surface: Paintings by Crystal Vicars-Pugh” from Oct. 9 to Oct. 25.  The gallery will host a reception with the artist at the gallery on Friday, Oct. 24, from 4 to 7 PM.  All receptions are free and open to the public. The gallery is located on the brick road in Lebanon, Ill. at 224 W. St. Louis Street. The gallery’s hours are 1-4 PM, Thursday through Saturday.

 Amy MacLennan, one of McKendree University’s art professors, commented on Crystal Vicars-Pugh’s work which will be presented at the event: “In her series of paintings entitled “Submerge and Surface,” Vicar-Pugh creates a metaphor for water in paint. Colors and textures ripple, concealing and revealing parts of the painting’s history. Paint reflects like a mirror on the surface of a quiet lake, then freezes, trapping the past in icy puddles. Like rain-washed surfaces, fluid paint performs something like a baptism, allowing areas previously hidden to resurface anew.”

The artist, Vicars-Pugh, in response, said, “To me, painting is a spiritual event. The space between painter and canvas is natural, supernatural, and spiritual. I delight in the evolution of process, and my work addresses ones inner self, connecting with outside world. While painting, I reflect on the outside world allowing my inner self to translate my sensory reaction to the scenery into abstract paint. […]My paintings explore life’s mystery. There is a veil between what we think we know and what might really be there. My work describes a force much larger than me. It is this natural, powerful force that at times I can almost explain, but for the most part remains obscure.”

If you are interested in learning more about Vicars-Pugh’s artwork, stop by McKendree University’s Gallery of Art at any time between 4 and 7 PM from Oct. 9 to Oct. 25.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus, Campus Advertisements, Campus Announcements, Campus Events | Leave a comment

Highland School District Teachers Strike

BY EMILY LUCIA
Assistant Editor

Talk of a strike had been a much discussed topic at the start of the 2014-2015 school year in Highland, Ill. But despite relentless efforts from both the school board and the teachers, on Tuesday, Sept. 9, the teachers of Highland CUSD #5 voted to strike. On

Highland High School Website

Highland High School Website

Thursday, Sept. 11th, the strike began. As a result, quite the controversy among the students, parents, and alumni from the district has arisen, dividing the community. While the majority of people support the teachers, there are many citizens that feel that the teachers are abandoning the students, some even going so far as to posting hateful messages online and spouting rude comments to the teachers themselves.

According to the Highland Illinois Teachers’ Association (HIEA)’s Facebook page, the teachers have requested that the school board honors the step that they were promised when they were hired. A step is a pay increase for the years of service a teacher completes. To show the drastic need for the school board to honor these steps, the administrators of the Facebook page stated “A teacher hired this year at HCUSD who has taught in another school district for 6 years is hired in at step 6 on the salary schedule, but a teacher who has dedicated the same 6 years of service to HCUSD is being told by [the school board] to stay at step 5.” So it is to be understood that with the exception of the new teachers, the veteran teaching staff was being paid less than they should have been. Many members of the Highland community agree that this is because there is no money in the school district to cover this step increase.

Kelsey Hoyt, an alumni from Highland High School, now a teacher herself slightly sympathetic for the teachers. “As a teacher myself, I understand that we are grossly underpaid and under-appreciated,” she responded. But she also supports the students and their education, which is caught in the middle of the dispute. “Highland teachers seem to be forgetting exactly why they went into teaching in the first place: for the love of kids and bettering their education. People always say that we aren’t in it for the money, and the truth is, none of us are.”

On Saturday, Sept. 13, a group of students met at the Highland Square (a central park in the city), to peacefully protest the strike. Many held signs stating that they want to be back in the classroom. “As an educator, it breaks my heart to see these kids deprived of what they need most in today’s world:  helping hand. So yes, it’s true– Teachers are underpaid and deserve more, hands down. But is it fair to take away what the students need most right now, just to have some extra cash in our pockets?” Hoyt commented, furthering the point that the students are the ones that are the most impacted in the situation.

Sheila Riggs, a parent in the school district, on the other hand, voiced her support for the school board. “I am more pleased by how the [Board of Education] are conducting themselves.  They are worried about the budget (a problem that I, personally, think they created themselves).  I think they should stick to their guns on this.  There is no money to give more.  We already have to cut [programs].” Riggs stated.

According to a school board member who would like to remain anonymous, these facts are true.

Riggs also mentioned that she understands where the teachers are coming from but blames their union representative for the longevity and poor deals of the strike. “ I am good friends with a lot of teachers who really just feel that the Union is misleading and/or using them.  I think that their representative, Shianne Shively did them a huge disservice last weekend with the meeting.  One parent said it best:  They should quit their union and put the 10% they pay in union dues toward a good PR agent because too many parents and students have lost respect for them.”

Mindy Allen, a senior at McKendree majoring in Secondary Education commented on how this strike affects the education students at McKendree. “As an education major, I feel like I know what I’m getting into. Although funding for education is not where it should be, I don’t think education majors should be scared off.” While she understands where the teachers are coming from, Allen agreed with many commentators that teaching should be about the students rather than the pay.

Another McKendree student, Hope Waters, a music education major had something similar to say. “I have always known going into education that I was not going to be rich. I knew that [education] was going to be a lot of work for low pay compared to other jobs. However it was not the reason why I went into music education.” Waters also understood why the teachers were striking but like Allen and Hoyt, she states that she is going into education to help students develop skills that they will be able to use in their future. “Because of my experience with going through the classes and process of getting the degree, I realized that it is hard, I couldn’t even imagine doing it every day for your job with the pressures of keeping up with the ever changing standards and to help keep funds for your school, or in my case the constant fear of keeping my job due to budget cuts of non-core classes such as music.”

Riggs also had advice for future educators, “In our current economy, future educators should 1.)  Not put their faith in Unions that truly do not have their best interest at heart, 2.) Be grateful for the job and the salary you have because it CAN be worse, and 3.)  Know that the intangibles outweigh whatever monetary compensation you can fight for and that respect comes from making the right decisions for the ones who matter the most: the kids.”

Hoyt also had a few notes of advice, “Think a little less about the bills, the clothes, and all other material things and think more about what is truly important in this world. Think about how you as a teacher have the ability to impact your student’s lives every day, and think about all the time you are losing with them add the hours tick by. Each day without school is a day without hope for the future.”

On Thursday Sept. 18th the strike ended and school resumed the next day. With hopes that everyone could put the situation behind them, the community and the teachers returned to caring about the most important thing: the education of the students.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Local/Campus News, News | Leave a comment

McKendree Takes 2nd Place at Loyola University and Southwest Baptist University!

BY JOSEPH BLASDEL, PH.D. 
Contributing Writer

The McKendree University Speech and Debate team took 2nd place at tournaments on consecutive weekends, taking home 18 individual awards.

“These two weekends were remarkably successful for us,” said Joe Blasdel, the coach of the Speech and Debate team. “This is a direct result of the work these students did during the summer and continue to do this fall.”

Loyola:  Back: Joe Blasdel, Quinn McRoberts, Trent Boyer, Alex Baldwin, Gage Simmons, Rodney McBride, Mary Makarishcheva, Brent Nicholson.  Front: David Junge, Beth Graham Credit: McKendree Debate Team

Loyola:
Back: Joe Blasdel, Quinn McRoberts, Trent Boyer, Alex Baldwin, Gage Simmons, Rodney McBride, Mary Makarishcheva, Brent Nicholson.
Front: David Junge, Beth Graham
Credit: McKendree Debate Team

Six colleges and universities attended Loyola University’s debate tournament, including Appalachian State University, Missouri Western State University and Cedarville University, on Sept. 26-28. Representing McKendree were senior Trent Boyer; junior Quinn McRoberts; sophomores Mary Makarishcheva and Rodney McBride; and first-years Alex Baldwin, Beth Graham, David Junge and Gage Simmons.

At the first half, in the open division, the team of Makarishcheva and McBride, as well as the team of Boyer and McRoberts, went 3-1 and finished as quarterfinalists. In the novice division, the team of Baldwin and Simmons posted a 4-0 record, winning both the semifinal and final round, to finish as novice champions. The team of Graham and Junge went 3-1 and finished as semifinalists. Graham won top novice speaker, while Simmons took 4th place.

At the second half, the team of Makarishcheva and McBride and the team of Baldwin and Simmons each went 4-1, finishing as quarterfinalists. Boyer and McRoberts, as well as Graham and Junge, went 3-2 to finish as octofinalists. Baldwin won top novice speaker, while Simmons took 2nd place.

Southwest Baptist:  Front: Hannah Zickefoose, Emeri Farnam, Katie Reining.  Middle: Taylor Rossi, Spencer Marcum, Rebecca Blake.  Back: Briar North, Caleb Vines, Josh Fleming. Credit: McKendree Debate Team

Southwest Baptist:
Front: Hannah Zickefoose, Emeri Farnam, Katie Reining.
Middle: Taylor Rossi, Spencer Marcum, Rebecca Blake.
Back: Briar North, Caleb Vines, Josh Fleming.
Credit: McKendree Debate Team

Eleven colleges and universities attended Southwest Baptist University’s speech tournament, including Bowling Green State University, the University of Central Missouri and Cameron University, on Oct. 4. Representing McKendree were seniors Rebecca Blake, Josh Fleming, Spencer Marcum and Caleb Vines; sophomores Katie Reining and Taylor Rossi; and first-years Emeri Farnam, Briar North and Hannah Zickefoose.

Marcum won 1st place in programmed oral interpretation, 2nd place in drama, 3rd place in prose, 4th place in poetry and 4th place in individual sweepstakes. Reining took 1st place in informative speaking and 2nd place in informative speaking. Blake finished in 3rd place in after dinner speaking and 6th place in drama, while winning 5th place with Fleming in duo. Fleming also took 4th place in programmed oral interpretation. Emeri Farnam and Hannah Zickefoose finished in 4th place in duo and were the top novices in the event. Zickefoose was also the top novice in programmed oral interpretation. North won 5th place in drama and top novice, while also finishing in 6th place in informative speaking. Rossi took 6th place in persuasive speaking.

McKendree will next compete in debate at its home tournament on Oct. 17-19 and in speech at the University of Central Missouri on Oct. 18-19.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus, Campus Organization, Local/Campus News, News | Leave a comment

McKendree University Women’s Soccer Drops 4-2 Decision to Drury

BY MCKENDREE UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS
Contributing Writer(s)
Google Images

Google Images

The McKendree University women’s soccer team lost a conference match to Drury University on Sunday 4-2. The Bearcats fall to 5-8 overall and 4-6 in the Great Lakes Valley Conference (GLVC) and will travel to Kansas City, Mo., on Friday, Oct. 17 to face Rockhurst University at 5 PM.

McKendree got on the scoreboard first in the eighth minute on a header goal by sophomore midfielder Lauren Mantei (Springfield, Ill./Rochester) off a double-assist by junior midfielder Alyssa Patterson (Troy, Ill./Triad) and senior midfielder Liz Kaiser (St. Louis, Mo./Ursuline). The Panthers responded shortly after with a goal by Ciara O’Brien in the 12th minute to tie the game 1-1.

Senior midfielder Mary Geiger (Fairmont City, Ill./Althoff Catholic) put the Bearcats in front on a goal in the 32nd minute on Patterson’s second assist of the game to make the score 2-1.

The Panthers went on to score three goals in the second half, all by Shelby Hatz, to take a 4-2 lead and hold on for the win. Junior goalkeeper Taylor Zerbe (St. Louis, Mo./Trinity Catholic) had five saves in the loss and fell to 5-4 in goal this season.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus Announcements, Local/Campus News, News, Sports | Leave a comment

McKendree University Men’s Soccer Falls to No. 25 Drury 2-0

BY MCKENDREE UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS
Contributing Writer(s)
Google Images

Google Images

The McKendree University men’s soccer team was unable to upset No. 25 Drury University on Sunday in a 2-0 loss. The Bearcats fall to 3-7-2 overall and 3-6-1 in the Great Lakes Valley Conference (GLVC) and will travel to Kansas City, Mo., on Friday, Oct. 17 at 7:30 PM.

McKendree was matched up with the Panthers offensively, only being outshot 15-14 in the contest. Drury got on the scoreboard in the 29th minute on a goal by Charles Guelly to take a 1-0 lead. The Panthers added a second goal in the 85th minute on a goal by Nick Ammann.

Junior goalkeeper Scott Armistead (Auckland, New Zealand/Saint Peter’s College) had nine saves in the loss and fell to 3-6-2 overall in goal this season.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus, Local/Campus News, News, Sports | Leave a comment

[Iss. 4] || New & Coming Soon to Places Near You

BY JENNA TEETOR
Contributing Writer
All synopses are original.
 
Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: Whiplash
Director: Damien Chazelle
Theaters: Oct. 10

Synopsis: “A young drummer is admitted into one of the best music schools in the country. His instructor cares for nothing but the best of the band and teaching his students to reach their highest potential…and then more. If you think your professor is harsh, find what this one is like next weekend!”

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: St. Vincent
Director: Theodore Melfi  

Theaters: Oct. 10

Synopsis: “After a young boy’s parents divorce, he finds himself moving next to an old, broke, war veteran. He needs someone to look after him while his mother can’t, and his neighbor needs the money. A little boy plus an alcoholic war veteran should equal disaster. But, can friendship be found along the way?

Find out in theaters!”

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: Dracula Untold
Director: Gary Shore

Theaters: Oct. 10

Synopsis: “In order to save his kingdom and his family, Dracula turns to supernatural forces to aid him in his pursuits. Although, power comes with great consequences. Join Dracula in his fight for his family, and his humanity in this thrilling, untold story of how it all began.”

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: The Blood of Olympus
Author: Rick Riordan

Release Date: Oct. 6

Synopsis: “The Greek and Romans have teamed up to defeat a common enemy, Gaea. Although, as the days tick by, the chances of them defeating her seem more and more worrisome. With threats of war between the camps, and more powerful enemies rising up, the hope of surviving is dwindling. Everyone may not make it, but they’ll die trying.”

 

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: The Young Elites
Author: Marie Lu

Release Date: Oct. 7 (Pre-order)

Synopsis: “A virus swept across the nation, killing millions. The children who survived were left with strange scars or markings. Not only that, but they were gifted with powers from out of this world. Join three characters on one of their separate adventures and see how their paths intertwine.”

 

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: Rise of Isis
Authors: Jay Sekulow, Jordan Sekulow, Robert W Ash, David French

Release Date: Oct. 14

Synopsis: “As the threat of two harmful terrorist groups are left undefeated, it has the potential to warp into a horrifying genocide against Christians in the Middle East. If you want to understand more about these two terrorist groups and the threat they carry, then this book is a must-read.”

 

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: Survivor’s Remorse
Network: Starz

Premiere Date: Oct. 4 at 9/8c

Synopsis: “As an amateur baller rises up to stardom, he feels the need to give back to the people in his home-town, and those around him. Jump on board with Cam Calloway in this hilarious comedy as he deals with freeloaders, groupies, and living the so-called dream.”

 

 

 

 

Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

Title: Mulaney
Channel: Fox

Air Date: October 5 at 9/8c

Synopsis: “Sand-up comedian John Mulaney gets hired to work on a game-show. In this rib-cracking comedy, it shows the complete randomness of day-to-day life among family, friends and work with refreshing stand-up comedy on the side. It’s too random to define, but one thing is for sure: it’s Mulaney.”

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Entertainment | Leave a comment

The Story of Winter is not over yet…

A Film Review
BY KIMBERLY BENNETT
Editor-in-Chief
Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

In Sept. 2011, Alcon Entertainment released the family-favorite motion picture, Dolphin Tale, and received approximately 72.2 million dollars as a gross income by Jan. 2012. As the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) award-winning film captured the hearts of many mammal-lovers across the United States, Dolphin Tale has enthused people to travel to Clearwater, Fla. in order to see Winter, the main character (and attraction) of both motion picture and Clearwater Marine Aquarium. The awe-inspiring tale of Winter  the dolphin and young Sawyer Nelson (Nathan Gamble), directed by Charles Martin Smith, tells the story of a beautiful relationship between a lonely boy and a tailless dolphin.

While Dolphin Tale is more about Winter learning to wear a prosthetic tail and focuses on the development of Sawyer Nelson’s relationship with her, Dolphin Tale 2 continues a few years later and proves that the story of Winter is not over yet. Also based on true events, Dolphin Tale 2, released Sept. 12, 2014, is just as, if not more, inspiring and well-portrayed as its predecessor. Dolphin Tale may have centered more on Winter and her budding relationship with Sawyer, but the sequel is far more concentrated on Winter’s ability to connect with another female dolphin.

Because dolphins travel and swim in groups, they are not supposed to be isolated for any prolonged length of time. It is in a dolphin’s nature to swim with other dolphins; the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has strict regulations in which dolphins must swim in an aquarium with at least one other same-sex dolphin so lonely Bottlenoses do not fall into a state of depression.

Since Winter’s 40-year-old female swimming partner dies of unknown causes, it is important for Clearwater Marine Aquarium’s director, Dr. Clay Haskett (Harry Connick Jr.) to find another female dolphin to swim with Winter in order to keep Winter in the aquarium. While one of the board members, Phillip J. Hordern (Tom Nowicki) pressured Dr. Haskett into having Mandy – the only other female dolphin in captivity at Clearwater Marine Aquarium – swim with Winter, he decides against it, not wanting to keep a now-healthy, wild dolphin captive. And thus, Dr. Haskett makes the decision to free Mandy against the board’s wishes.

Without Mandy, the aquarium faces the possibility of losing Winter to another facility, and hope is the last resource the members of the aquarium have in order to keep Winter from leaving. But the question is, how will they find her?

Curious to know what happens to Winter? See Dolphin Tale 2 in theaters today.  

Dolphin Tale 2 is directed and written by Charles Martin Smith. Ashley Judd, Morgan Freeman and Kriss Kristopherson also star.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Entertainment, Movie/Book Reviews | Leave a comment

Reminder|| McKendree Humanities Fall 2014 Essay Contest Guidelines

RE-PROMOTED BY THE MCKENDREE REVIEW

It’s time to show off your writing skills by participating in the annual Humanities Division Essay contest!

You may view the flier here: Humanities_Essay+contest_2014

This year you may choose from one of two prompts: The Villain You Love to Hate or Hate to Love! and What’s Alive in the Cemetery?.

Prompt Idea #1: The Villain You Love to Hate or Hate to Love!

Have you ever heard the saying “The Devil has all the best tunes?” Many times the devil, or villain, also has the best lines in movies and books. So, as villains continue to take center stage in entertainment, we have to ask ourselves, “If it is “good to be bad,” then who’s thebaddest of them all and why?”

For your essay contest submission, identify and argue who you believe is the best fictional villain (someone you love to hate or hate to love) whether from book, film, t.v., musical, play, or game. Then, in a 4-5 page essay using at least one outside source, explain why and attempt to persuade us!

Don’t forget to include a Works Cited page!

  1. Prompt Idea #2: What’s Alive at the Cemetery?

St. Louis’ Bellefontaine cemetery has been described as “a majestic, 19th century park, with thousands of big trees spread out over more than 300 acres” (LaCapra, 2014). Nothing spooky about that! Typically, conversations about cemeteries revolve around the spooky and the supernatural — even the metaphorical. While the cemetery is often used as a metaphor for loss or the end of life, one visit to Bellefontaine cemetery, and a different image begins to surface. Cemeteries can be a place of refuge — where the living and the deceased may find peace and solace.

For your essay contest submission, answer the question: What’s really alive at the cemetery? Then, in a 4-5 page essay using at least one outside source, explain why and attempt to persuade us!

Don’t forget to include a Works Cited page!

All essay entries must be submitted to Stephanie Quinn smquinn@mckendree.edu by October 31, 2014, at 11:59pm Central Time!

Guidelines:

  • Only one entry per student.
  • All entries must be typed and submitted via email.

Awards:

Essays will be evaluated based on academic writing conventions BUT creativity will be rewarded as well.

First place award: $100 and publication in Montage and McKendree Review
Second place award: $50 and honorable mention in Montage and McKendree Review
Third place award: $25 and honorable mention in Montage and McKendree Review

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Articles, Campus Advertisements, Campus Announcements, Campus Events | Leave a comment

McKendree Review Invites Students to see “The Judge”

BY KALEIGH ADMIRE
Staff Writer
Credit: Kaleigh Admire

Credit: Kaleigh Admire

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Campus Advertisements, Campus Events | Leave a comment

Come to the Hett!

PROVIDED BY ELIZABETH CRABTREE
Box Office Manager
Contributing Writer

If you are interested in attending any events at the Hettenhausen Center for Visual Arts, please take a look at the following schedule of events.

Provided by the Hett.

Provided by the Hett.

Posted in Articles, Campus, Campus Advertisements, Campus Events, Campus Announcements, 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4 | Leave a comment

“Hang In There”

Song lyrics
BY BENJAMIN RICHTER
Contributing Writer

You know what you want but don’t know how to get it.
You want to continue, but your mind says quit it.
You need to keep moving, but your legs have quit walking.
You have a lot to say but can’t do any talking.

 I was just like you.
And I  know what you’ve got to do.

You need to hang in there, darling.
You’re in too deep to quit.
Hang in there, darling.
You’ll find your way out of this.

Just hang in there.

You know where to go but can’t find how to get there.
You walk the beaten path, but it leads you nowhere.
You need to stay strong, but the tears start falling.
You’ve got a dead phone, but everyone is calling.

 I was just like you.
And I  know what you’ve got to do.

You need to hang in there, darling.
You’re in too deep to quit.
Hang in there, darling.
You’ll find your way out of this.

Just hang in there.

Have something creative you would like to share with the “Review?”
Send it our way at mckreview@mckendree.edu.

 

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Creative Writing, Entertainment | Leave a comment

[Entertainment] || Emberlyisms #3 || A Special

Written and Illustrated by Kimberly Bennett
Editor-in-Chief
Credit: Kimberly Bennett

Credit: Kimberly Bennett

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Comics, Entertainment | Leave a comment

[Entertainment] || Sudoku

PROVIDED BY THE MCKENDREE REVIEW

Here are the solutions for the previous word search puzzle.

puzzle

puzzles.ca

We have decided that the word searches and the Sudoku will only be available in the printed issues.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Entertainment, Sudoku | Leave a comment

[Entertainment] || Word Search

PROVIDED BY THE MCKENDREE REVIEW

Here are the solutions for the previous word search puzzle in Iss. 3.

comedy_movies_1_solution

puzzles.ca

We have decided that the word searches and the Sudoku will only be available in the printed issues.

 

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 4, Entertainment, Word Searches | Leave a comment

[Vol. 93, Iss. 3] || The McKendree Review Crew

avatar-image3

Vol. 93, Iss. 3

Editors

Kimberly Bennett
Editor-in-Chief

Mindy Allen
Assistant Editor

Emily Lucia
Assistant Editor / Web Manager

Editing Team

Mindy Allen
Kimberly Bennett
Emily Lucia
Donna Bick*

In This Issue

Mindy Allen
Sharon Beard
Kimberly Bennett
Donna Bick
Joseph Blasdel, Ph.D.
Katie Herath
Earnest Johnson
Emily Lucia
Benjamin Richter
Jenna Teetor
Natalie Van Booven
Chelsey Wheeler
Connor White

* volunteer

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions, which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at 701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, NEW McK Review Issues, Review Crew

[Iss. 3] Leditors | A Letter from the Editors

avatar-image3

Hello everyone!

First of all, we printed our first issue last Tuesday, and if you have not checked out the printed copy, you can find the McKendree Review all around campus, especially in 1828, PAC and Ames. We want to thank all of you who helped us with all of the articles.

We would like to formally apologize to Benjamin Richter as his name is not Eric Richter as stated in the “In This Issue” section of the printed edition. We have corrected his name in the online version and are incredibly sorry for the mishap.

In this issue, in addition to the articles you have read (or did not read) in the printed edition, there is a write-up regarding our school’s debate team, there are more pictures and videos for you to watch.

Enjoy!

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Letters from the Editors, NEW McK Review Issues

McKendree University Welcomes Bearcat Statue

There’s more to the Bearcat than What Meets the Eye!

BY KIMBERLY BENNETT
Editor-in-Chief
McKendree University’s NEW Bearcat Statue, located in front of Holman Library. Photo Credit: Kimberly Bennett

McKendree University’s NEW Bearcat Statue, located in front of Holman Library.
Photo Credit: Kimberly Bennett

A few days into the 2014-15 academic year, McKendree University installed a new Bearcat statue in front of Holman Library as a way to begin a great semester. While some students welcome the statue with open arms, others are curious as to why McKendree bothered spending money on a mascot statue rather than a statue of the school’s founder, William McKendree. Makes sense, do you not agree? I, myself, wondered the same thing, but after interviewing Joni Bastian, Ph.D., who co-led the project with President James Dennis, Ph.D., I am satisfied with her answers. Hopefully, others will be too.

Had I known the Bearcat statue was something a majority of students wanted, I would have been less harsh on the project initially. Before the statue was built, I did not think it would be a great investment. However, now that it stands prominently in front of Holman Library and gives McKendree University a fiercer depiction of the Bearcat (though not as accurate, I must say), I am convinced the project was a good endeavor to pursue.

“Over the years, we have surveyed students on a variety of different topics including traditions and campus spirit,” Dr. Bastian explained when I asked her why McKendree would build a Bearcat statue instead of William McKendree. “Often students shared that having a Bearcat statue would enhance some of the older traditions that are valued as well as create new ones. A statue of William McKendree has been requested by students and alumni as well. I do hope that a statue of William McKendree will someday be created and have a place of prominence on our beautiful campus.”

I was grateful to find out that there will be a William McKendree statue in our university’s future; I think our founder deserves some recognition other than a few paintings and pictures here and there in the library or a bust in Piper.

Taylor Rossi, sophomore, had a similar opinion to mine about the statue: “When I first saw it, I thought it was a waste of money. A lot of things on campus could benefit us more. [For example], could that money have been spent on trying to provide free/cheaper laundry to campus residents? Or to begin updating Voigt? And while I still believe that these things are significantly more important than having a hollow, metal statue of an immature male lion, it’s growing on me. It does look kind of cool, and if it makes more people fall in love with McKendree, I suppose it’s worth it. We’re investing in the future, right?”

Google Images

Google Images

Indeed, just like Rossi said, despite the misrepresentation of the Bearcat animal, the statue is a very nice piece of work. Rossi’s insight on the amount of money it took to invest in the statue was spot-on; in simpler terms, the statue’s investment was not cheap by any means.

And yes, that money could have been spent on other projects for McKendree University, but as all of you can see, it wasn’t. In fact, McKendree University did not spend the campus’s money to pay for the statue. Rather, the funds came from McKendree-centric groups.

Regarding the financial aspect of the project, Dr. Bastian added, “The Bearcat statue was privately funded by students, members of the Board of Trustees, Alumni Board and the senior administration. The final cost will be between $50,000 and $60,000.”

With that amount of money spent towards the project, I think it is safe to say a great deal of people wanted the Bearcat statue to proudly stand in the center of McKendree to represent campus pride. Speaking of the center of McKendree—smack-dab in the center of the Holman Library walkway—I wanted to know why McKendree University wanted the statue to stand where it was built.

“We chose its location because of the student traffic flow through that area and also wanted the statue to be seen from Alton Street,” Dr. Bastian explained.

Unfortunately, with all of the road construction going on down Alton Street, it will be a while before many people can drive by and see the statue in all its glory. Hopefully, the road construction, which, according to a source, should take about 70 work days, will be able to be completed without delay so the statue can be seen from the main road of McKendree.

Google Images

Google Images

As a final comment about the statue, Dr. Bastian concluded our interview by saying, “We know that students will understand that the statue is a valuable piece of art that we need to respect and one that we will cherish for many years to come. We encourage students to take photos with their Bearcat; students may stand on the granite foundation which was created for many photo opportunities that will take place.”

That being said, when you are walking by the statue, whip out your phone and capture some McKendree history for your college scrapbook. Respect the Bearcat, and the Bearcat will respect you. Remember, the statue is a brand new McKendree monument that will bring about campus spirit and pride to the university.

While the statue “may” misrepresent the true depiction of a Bearcat, it does bring about a sense of homeliness, because, without the Bearcat, all McKendree would have left is its outstanding educational and athletic values. Just as the statue is planted at the center of McKendree, the Bearcat—our mascot—is what holds our university together. Bogey, the Bearcat, is the center, the glue, the foundation which keeps McKendree University grounded.

Be sure to check out the statue on your way to class this semester and take a selfie with it.

Be a proud McKendrean.

GO BEARCATS!

 

 

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Articles, Campus, Features, Local/Campus News, NEW McK Review Issues, News

Road Construction on Alton Street

BY MINDY ALLEN
Staff Writer
Alton Street  Photo Credit: Kimberly Bennett

Alton Street
Photo Credit: Kimberly Bennett

Sometime after the week of Sept. 15, Alton Street is scheduled to be closed for road construction, as long as weather or other issues do not cause further delays. The project is following previous construction, which moved the water line from under the street to beside the street. The past road construction explains why the street was half rock, half pavement during the beginning of the semester. Sally Mayhew, McKendree’s Vice President for Administration and Finance explains that the road construction is “all in the name of progress” and Alton will be “a very nice street with curbs and gutters.” When the construction finally begins, the road will be closed to through traffic, and it is important for McKendree students to know how to navigate around the construction and access lot C. Alternative routes, suggested by Public Safety, are shown on the map below.

The project is estimated to take 70 workdays, which exclude weekends and any other days when weather does not allow construction to take place. Rain and winter weather could cause the project to take longer than estimated.

MAP

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Articles, Campus, Campus Announcements, Features, NEW McK Review Issues

From the Archives… President Thomas Hanson Herdman

BY KATIE HERATH
Staff Writer

Between 1890 and 1893, Reverend Thomas H. Herdman served as president of McKendree College, serving one of the shortest terms for a president in McKendree’s history. So What makes this president interesting, and why did he only hold this position for three years?

Rev. T.H. Herdman From McKendree Archives

Rev. T.H. Herdman
From McKendree Archives

Thomas Herdman attended three different colleges, the last being McKendree, where he received his A.M. and D.D. (Associates and Doctorate in Divinity). While serving as a pastor in the Southern Illinois Methodist Conference, he pastored the church in Lebanon twice, spending a large portion of his life as a resident of the town.

Shortly after receiving his D.D., he was asked to fill the vacant seat of president of McKendree College, following Isaiah Villar’s sudden departure of the seat. During his administration, Herdman struggled with paying the mortgage debt for the school. Interestingly enough, McKendree faced foreclosure at the time, and Herdman did everything in his power to save money to pay off the mortgage.

One specific incidence was utilizing the Athleteon building (where Wildy is now) for both study hall and chapel services. At that time, chapel was held each morning, and church was held twice each Sunday; students were required to attend them all. Students were also required to spend two hours each night in their own rooms studying. The latter was highly unpopular and was dropped from school records.

Also during his presidency, the vacancy of a Greek and German professor was filled, which was the only major faculty change at the time. This change had a great impact on the future of the college. Morris L Barr was hired for the position and became popular among the students. Students loved him so much they requested for Barr to be McKendree’s president. President Herdman was very humble, giving up his position, as he “was always willing to make any sacrifice which his brethren believed would advance the cause of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth.”

Photo Credit: Katie Herath

Photo Credit: Katie Herath

McKendree would keep Herdman as Dean of the Post-graduate Theological Departments of McKendree, a position created just for Thomas Herdman. He taught at McKendree for another five years before returning to ministering the churches in the area. Two of Herdman’s relatives would attend McKendree, including his adopted daughter, Minnie Herdman Clemens (1896) and his niece, Etta Herdman Doud (1884). Rev. Herdman died in 1916 and is buried in College Hill Cemetery.

Pieces from the Herdman-Doud collection will be on display in the McKendree History Museum during the month of October. The museum is open from 10 AM to noon every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The exhibit is located on the main floor of Bothwell Chapel.

Information on Rev. T. H. Herdman was taken from “Centennial McKendree College History” and the Herdman-Doud collection of the McKendree Archives.

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Articles, Blast from the Past, Campus, Features, NEW McK Review Issues

Google at McKendree University

BY EARNEST JOHNSON
Contributing Writer

Earnest Johnson, new to McKendree University, seeks to share with the university his experience in the Google Student Ambassador program. Johnson is a junior majoring in Business Management and a transfer from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. Over the summer, Johnson had the opportunity to attend one of Google’s training sessions in Mountain View, California as a part of the ambassador program.

Throughout the year, Johnson plans to host fun events on campus as well as introduce fellow students to the latest Google products and programs. He is currently working on organizing a new campus organization and is excited to begin this first year as a Bearcat. For more information and/or ideas you would like to share, “like” and “message” Google at McKendree University on Facebook. Also, if you have questions or suggestions contact Ambassador Johnson at edjohnson@mckendree.edu.

Earnest Johnson, a proud Google Ambassador

Earnest Johnson, a proud Google Ambassador

 

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Articles, Campus, Features, NEW McK Review Issues

McKendree University Hires New Faculty and Staff During Summer

Over the summer, McKendree University hired a total of 12 new faculty and staff members during the summer of 2014. For the next several issues, the McKendree Review plans to publish profiles for each of our new faculty and staff members, but for now, we simply want to welcome them to the family.

The following names of the new faculty and staff members was provided by our dean, Christine Bahr, Ph.D so we would like to thank Dr. Bahr for generously sending us their names.

Janice Albers, M.S.N.* || Division of Nursing
S.J. Creek, Ph.D. || Division of Social Sciences
Sameer Dutta, Ph.D. || Division of Computing
Elizabeth Erickson, Ph.D. || School of Business
Allison Fahsl, Ph.D. || School of Education
Haliman Herjanto, Ph.D. || School of Business
Kim Yun-Hee, Ph.D. || School of Business
Angela LaMora, Ph.D. || Division of Science & Mathematics
Theodore Massey, M.S., M.Ed.* || Division of Computing
Elizabeth Thiry, Ph.D. || Division of Computing
Donna Ulrich, M.B.A* || School of Business

*
M.S.N. ~ Master of Science in Nursing
M.S. ~ Master of Science
M.Ed. ~ Master of Education
M.B.A. ~ Master of Business Administration

If you have any of these professors as your instructor for any of your classes, please welcome them to McKendree if you have not already done so.

To all of the new faculty and staff members at McKendree University:

Welcome to the Bearcat Family!

 

Posted in 2014-15: Vol. 93, Iss. 3, Campus, Features, Local/Campus News, NEW McK Review Issues, News