[2014-2015] Vol. 93, Iss. 12 The Review Crew

 

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Vol. 93, Iss. 12

Editors

Emily Lucia
Editor-in-Chief

Taquisha Drisdell
Assistant Editor 

Will Basler
Sports Editor

Editing Team

Emily Lucia
Taquisha Drisdell

In This Issue

Will Basler
Leah Cummins
Taquisha Drisdell
Maggie Mueller
Ashly Schmitt
Jacob Schlote
Lauren Reeves
Natalie Van Booven

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions,
which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in
Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at
701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
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Leditor from the Editor

As the Spring semester winds down we find ourselves bogged down by end of the semester tests, projects and papers. But one thing that always keeps me going is writing and reading. I have been so very blessed this semester that I have had the opportunity to write and edit and read article submissions for The McKendree Review. I was a little worried at the beginning of the semester that we would not get many articles, but as the semester drew on, I was very excited to see that students take to writing articles just as I do. Not because they have to, but because they want to. As you read this last online edition of the semester, remember that this paper would be nothing without the students who write for it. Also it would be nothing if not for you, the readers, who visit this website or pick up a print copy.

Thank you for all of your support!

Happy Reading,
Emily Lucia
Editor-In-Chief

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New Graduation Requirements

BY LAUREN REEVES
Staff Writer

Two weeks ago, McKendree University announced that they will change the graduation credit requirement from 128 to 120 credits. McKendree thought this adjustment would be a good idea for students, but the students have a few thoughts of their own.

Freshman James Stanley, whom is studying to graduate with an Economics and Finance major with a minor in Environment Studies, believed the change wasn’t very significant. He also thought it all depended on your degree.

“No matter what major you are pursuing, sometimes you will have to take more than 120 or 128 credit hours. It all depends on the degree’s requirements.”

Stanley also believed that the decrease in hours will be a time saver for some students because they wouldn’t need to take the extra elective classes. Overall, Stanley felt indifferent about the credit change, but he is committed to acquire all the credits necessary to graduate with his degrees.

For some students, to gain their degrees like Stanley, they must try to keep their heads in the books and multitask by keeping their heads in the game.

For sophomore Halle Devoe, whom is studying psychology, she must balance the weights of being a good full-time student and playing two sports during her time at McKendree.

However, Devoe believes that the credit reduction falls short in her expectations. From trying to balance her goal-oriented life, she feels unmoved from the administration’s decision. Devoe feels she is not far enough along in her academic career at McKendree. She mentioned that if the reduction were more significant like 15 credits, then she would feel more moved than she currently is. In her life, she is constantly studying and practicing her sports, so she really doesn’t believe that this change will aid her in her efforts.

“It’s not that big of a deal.”

Unlike Stanley and Devoe, some students at McKendree aren’t feeling so indifferent about the university’s administrative decision. Some of McKendree’s 2015 graduating students are upset at the decision being announced so close to their graduation. Senior Ricky Cooper, graduating in May with a degree in psychology, remains unpleased by the credit reduction.

For Cooper, he met his credit requirements a semester ago, but he was unable to graduation because he did not have the significant amount of credits needed. He felt as if he was taking unnecessary classes that didn’t pertain to his program. He believed that if the announcement came earlier, it would have opened more doors for early graduates, thus allowing more students jump into the real job market or graduate school.

Also, Cooper wished the requirement change would have been made before or after this current school year. He thought the announcement’s timing aggravated some of his fellow seniors. However, Cooper wasn’t angered with McKendree because he was able to learn more about his major and will be able to take that knowledge with him.

   “My time wasn’t wasted. It was just long overdue, but I do recommend taking extra classes to better yourself.”

Overall, the time and energy you put into your studies are what really matters when it comes to graduating from McKendree University. Students will always have different opinions about the credit decision, but the end goal should be making sure you are handed your diploma when the time is right for you.

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Scotland Here She Comes

BY MAGGIE MUELLER
Contributing Writer

Elizabeth Gilman

Elizabeth Gilman

Elizabeth “Liz” Gilman is a junior at McKendree University from St. Louis Missouri. She decided to come to McKendree because she was offered a full ride basketball scholarship. After two years of basketball, she decided to focus just on her degree in mathematics through the education program. Now, just being a regular student at McKendree she was a little out of the norm. She then made a decision to do something most students only dream of. Liz applied to study abroad in Europe. For the 2015 spring semester, Liz received the chance to study for the whole semester in Scotland.

McKendree students can apply to take a full semester of college in another country all while still being a McKendree student. “Most of a student’s financial aid will be applied to offset the cost of studying abroad and classes are pre-approved to transfer back into McKendree so that a semester abroad doesn’t delay graduation.”

Liz made the decision to go on this once in lifetime journey three weeks into the 2014 fall semester. There are so many steps to go through to actually begin and eventually experience this journey. She started out by applying to the program here at McKendree. McKendree’s program has to accept you first and foremost.

Once getting accepted, she had to go through interviews with different faculty members, at random. After the interviews and applications were completed, Liz had to apply to Butler University’s study abroad program. McKendree University is too small of a university to have their own study abroad program, so they partnered up with a large university like Butler, which is also known as a host school. She applied to the University of Glasgow in Scotland through The Institute for Study Abroad-Butler University (IFSA), which is the formal name of the program.

After being accepted into IFSA Butler, Liz was required to renew her passport. She didn’t have to get a visa because she was only going to be there for one semester; six months. Since a visa is required to get a job in Scotland, Liz decided it was a no to the $200 visa and planned on saving a lot of money to take on her trip.

Next, she needed to choose all her classes she had to take. “It was a pain choosing

University of Glasgow in Scotland

University of Glasgow in Scotland

classes because all their courses were set up way different then America’s,” stated Liz. They list their courses by levels. In order to choose a certain math class, she had to choose from math level one, level two, level three, and/or level four. There is not different subjects of math like statistics or caculus, just levels. She explains how someone would think a level four class would be the class a student would take their fourth year of college, but that is completely wrong. A level four class is like a second-year graduate level class. Liz is a second-semester junior and a junior level mathematics class compared to the states is a math level one.

Once her classes were finally picked out, she had to get it approved by her advisor, Dr. Alewine, and by McKendree to make sure all her classes would transfer once she gets back. After McKendree approved it, they sent it to Butler who sent it to Glasgow.

She now had to set up her flights, phone service stuff, and pack and soon be on her way to Glasgow.

“I was so thankful my academic scholarship transferred from McKendree to Glasgow because that’s a huge amount taken off my tuition that I thought I was going to have to pay out of pocket,” says Liz. The tuition there was pretty close McKendree’s tuition and the housing was around $3000.

Liz arrived there in January. She was astounded by the school and how beautiful it was. The semester was broken down differently than in the United States. Liz started her classes in January and her last days of regular classes were at the end of March. She then got to travel around Europe during her spring break, which will last all the way until May. Once May rolls around, she will have to take finals. Liz gets the whole month of May to do so.

Liz (right) at the Isle of Seil

Liz (right) at the Isle of Seil

She is enjoying her long spring break because this gives her so much time to travel around Europe. After purchasing an unlimited train ticket for 500 pounds, or $750, Liz is traveling to Paris, Milan, Switzerland, Vienna, Amsterdam, Czechoslovakia, Venice, Frankford, and Rome. “The most amazing place I have been to thus far is Venice. It really is all they talk it up to be; a city built on water,” she explains. She thought Rome was cool, but could not stand the people one bit. They were all very rude and made crude comments the whole time she was there. One man even followed her all around the park. She was surprised that the UK and America were not all that different. “The UK definitely likes their drinks there a lot more. It is natural for every person to drink all the time there. There was no such thing as alcoholism.”

Elizabeth will be returning to the states after finals arriving on May 28th.

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The Patriot Act: Still a Good Idea?

BY NATALIE VAN BOOVEN
Staff Writer

Former U. S. President Calvin Coolidge once said, “Patriotism is easy to understand in America. It means looking out for yourself by looking out for your country.” Nowhere in recent American history has this point become clearer than in the wake of 9/11, especially when the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001—in short, the USA PATRIOT Act—was passed. At the time, it was hailed as the thing we needed to stop terrorism on our own shores. In fact, enthusiasm for the Act was such that former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) was the only Senator to reject it.

Now, 14 years later, several sections of the PATRIOT Act are set to expire in June, namely Section 206 (the roving wiretap provision) and Section 215 (the library provision). Section 6001 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorist Prevention Act of 2004 (the lone wolf provision) is also up for consideration. Though the deadline will not pass for another few months, the mere idea of re-authorizing the PATRIOT Act is already an extremely hot topic, both within and without Congress.

Among the people who support re-authorization, Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) and Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) are some of the biggest names. On the whole, they all support re-authorization because of the Act’s capacity to stop terrorist activities. Rubio in particular worries that “innocent Americans [will] pay the ultimate price” if the U. S. fails to “develop a strategy that is commensurate to the threat,” which is why he defends the National Security Agency’s spy programs and advocates for permanent re-authorization. McConnell, meanwhile, has said, “. . . now is not the time to be considering legislation that takes away the exact tools we need to combat ISIL.” And the tools are extensive.

The PATRIOT Act’s 10 sections attempt to block potential terrorists. Its scope is huge. Close to 20 laws—going as far back as the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938 and the National Security Act of 1947—have been altered in some way by the Act, whose most sweeping subsections are Title II (Enhanced Surveillance Procedures), Title III (Anti-Money Laundering to Prevent Terrorism), and Title IV (Border Security). Put briefly, Title II aims to scrutinize suspected terrorists, suspected computer abuse or fraud and suspected activity from foreign spies; Title III aims to stop, catch and indict money laundering, which could help fund terrorism; and Title IV aims to empower the U. S. Attorney General and the Immigration and Naturalization Service even more than in the past.

At former Rep. Richard Armey’s (R-Texas) urging, the PATRIOT Act contained several sunset provisions that were supposed to expire on Dec. 31, 2005. Unfortunately, in July of that year, both houses of Congress passed the USA PATRIOT and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2005, which not only re-authorized all but two of Title II’s sunset provisions (including Sections 206 and 215) but also created new provisions, such as giving the Secret Service new powers and enhancing seaport security. The Act would be re-authorized again in 2006 and 2011, this last time with an extension of four years.

I highlight Sections 206 and 215 because of their significance to the people who oppose re-authorization, including the Cato Institute, the American Civil Liberties Union, the American Library Association and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. These groups all argue in so many words that the PATRIOT Act, in its enthusiasm to find terrorists by any means necessary, threatens to override the protections of the Bill of Rights. The ALA said as much in its statement on the Act, which reads in part, “Libraries cooperate with law enforcement when presented with a lawful court order to obtain specific information about specific patrons; however, the library profession is concerned [that] some provisions in the USA PATRIOT Act go beyond the traditional methods of seeking information from libraries.” In other words, the PATRIOT Act’s broad capacities to find potential terrorists worries the ALA, as it worries the other aforesaid groups; and Sections 206 and 215 worry them the most

Section 206, known as the “roving John Doe wiretap” section, lets the government acquire surveillance orders that conceal who will be wiretapped, whether that “who” is a person or an organization. Presumably, such anonymity would allow law-enforcement agencies to do their work without alerting potential terrorists or alarming the public. However, the lack of identification allows feelings and hunches, rather than hard data, to guide searches, which conflicts with the Fourth Amendment’s rules about searches and seizures. Without names or other markers, The Big Lebowski’s premise could repeat itself many times over.

Meanwhile, Section 215, known as the library provision, lets the government acquire “any tangible thing” that could help a terrorism investigation, even without any indications that the thing(s) in question have to do with terrorist undertakings. Again, such broadness would presumably allow law enforcement to get their hands on as much evidence to build a case as possible. After all, when a man was arrested in D. C. for supposedly planning a shooting spree, House Speaker John Boehner said, “We would never have known about this had it not been for the FISA program and our ability to collect information on people who pose an imminent threat.” (FISA refers to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, which underwent major changes because of the PATRIOT Act.) However, the lack of specificity remains a problem, as it also conflicts with the Fourth Amendment’s “searches and seizures” clause. As it stands, Section 215 enables the National Security Agency to collect telephone records in bulk without first checking whether those records even pertain to national security.

By now, it should be evident that the PATRIOT Act is both comprehensive and incomprehensible, considering that it tries to tackle a broad threat with broad words. If, like Sen. Rubio, you believe that “the world is as dangerous as ever, and extremists are being cultivated and recruited right here at home,” then you can stop reading this article now. On the other hand, if the Act’s broadness bothers you, then you can take comfort in knowing that you are very far from alone. From the beginning, opponents of the Act pointed out the opportunistic nature of its passing. Another red flag, as pointed out by Michael Moore in Fahrenheit 9/11 and by Dahlia Litwick and Julia Turne in Slate magazine, is that hardly anybody in Congress read the bill. Thus, hardly anybody in Congress would know what the Act says about combating terrorism.

Besides, the broadness of the PATRIOT Act is worrying in yet another way, but this particular worry has to do with the nature of political writing. In April 1946, just after the end of WWII, George Orwell published his essay “Politics and the English Language,” which says in part, “In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of British rule in India, the Russian purges and deportations, the dropping of the atom bombs on Japan, can indeed be defended, but only by arguments which are too brutal for most people to face, and which do not square with the professed aims of the political parties. Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness.” In other words, even if Congress had read and debated the bill that became the PATRIOT Act, the Act itself would still have been subject to the influence of the party line. Therefore, imprecise and evasive writing would still have been a danger.

Sen. Rubio and the ALA are both right to worry about their fellow Americans’ fates, but the Act’s attempts at broadness—at least without any meaningful checks and balances—try too hard to do too much for too many people.

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Who is ISIS?

Understanding the Importance of
Keeping Up-to-Date with the News

BY LEAH CUMMINS
Contributing Writer

Until I took American Politics this semester, I never realized how many current events about which I did not learn. I noticed that a lot of college students ignore politics and say it does not apply to them (not including students majoring or interested in political science; this is just a generalization). However, many college students do not have a grip on current events. I personally am guilty of not always knowing what is going on in the world, but I still try to follow the news channels and see major events. After hearing the news every day in American Politics, I notice exactly how much I have missed when I do not take the time to learn about the daily news. Scrolling on Facebook or occasionally turning on the news is not enough for one to be completely caught up. It takes a little more. Currently, there is a large issue I think everyone has heard about, but not everyone has taken time to see what they do, and why they do it—the extremist group ISIS.

This terrorist group is led by a man named Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The group controls territory in Iraq and Syria and has deemed themselves to be the Islamic State (IS), of which the United Nations does not approve. Their official name, “ISIS,” stands for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and was created in 2013, and they have also been called “ISIL” which stands for Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. ISIS originally stemmed from Al-Qaeda of Iraq (AQI), but after a period of crisis in 2008 and 2009, their old leader Omar Al-Baghdadi was martyred, and this was when their current leader rose to power. They lost connection to AQI in this period.

ISIS’s goal is to expand and establish their Islamic state. One strategy ISIS has done to make money is to threaten and steal money from banks. Recently (especially as shown in the media), ISIS has changed tactics. They now show videos of people in ISIS doing horrible things, such as beheading people and killing targeted groups. They have committed many war crimes as well as killed soldiers and religious or minority groups. The group has been held together by their ideas and beliefs in certain figures to keep moral up. ISIS’s strong foundation – built upon resentment of the Sunni branch of Islam – recruits new followers and keeps their plans moving forward.

Now, ISIS’s strategy is to capture cities and create operations to strengthen their group. There have been a number of suicide bombers, decapitations of Egyptian Christians, followers throwing a gay man off a roof as well as killing women for not subjecting to the rules, and much more.

In 2014, ISIS has killed 17,049 civilians according to CNN. This number continues to rise even with the United States current airstrikes against ISIS. The big question is should the United States send ground troops to fight against ISIS? Many Americans feel as though this idea will end in failure, others feel sending troops overseas is unavoidable. According to CBS News, 65 percent of Americans view ISIS as a threat as of February 2015. There are also some statistics that show more Americans becoming in favor of sending troops as the situation worsens and more people are killed.

Many people make decisions on ISIS without knowing the entire; this shows that knowing current events is important to forming opinions and being able to discuss these matters with other Americans. It is also important to read a couple different articles on the same subject. Different journalists write to persuade differently and also include different aspects of the story on purpose. Not to say it is wrong, but it is always helpful to gain a bigger perspective than just one opinion. Keeping up on current events, such as ISIS, is definitely important, especially as ISIS gains power and US involvement becomes a possibility.

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Paul F. Tompkins

BY JACOB SCHLOTE
Contributing Writer

I was lucky enough to attend the stand-up comedy event performed by Paul F. Tompkins. The show was great, and I cried with laughter on several occasions throughout his hysterical show. The event was almost sold out and rightfully so as I don’t think anyone was disappointed. The show was as he put it, “based on the life and times of Paul F. Tompkins.”   He told a semi-life story, and it just so happens that he has lived a very hilarious life so far. He is from a war family, and his dad fought in WWII; he noted that people were not supposed to talk about their feelings to anyone, and as a result, he kept them bottled up inside forever.

Tompkins explained that because he was from that generation, he had a hard time with relationships and wanted someone who literally wanted nothing to do with him. As a result, he had a difficulty with people, not just relationships with women. He received his first gig in the late 80s, opening up for more well-known comedians. He later moved to L.A. in hopes of making it to the big time. He had been in numerous movies, small roles although, but nonetheless he was in a few well-known movies such as Magnolia (1999) and The Informant! (2009). He took us through the hardships of the comedy business as well as becoming a comedian – how difficult it is for someone like him to have a healthy relationship. Paul spoke about meeting his girlfriend then (now wife) and how much she had changed his life for the better. Paul had learned so much from her, and as he “would not be where he is today without her.”

Later on, Tompkins moved to New York, as he got more credited as a “funny man” and was able to start a healthy comedic business. He told us how he asked his wife to marry him as well as shared stories of their endeavors of raising children which was extremely funny to say the least. He did not get a driver’s license until he was 42 which is so unorthodox.   He closed the show with a go-to joke he shares in every show. The bit involved his wife and a “magic castle” – a hotel that housed an exclusive club especially for magicians. The joke had us rolling; at the end he thanked us for coming, and left. The audience tried for an encore performance but failed; however, the audience left fulfilled and wanted more from Tompkins. All laughed-out from a great performance, we exited the Hett.

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Science Athlete Extraordinaire

BY MAGGIE MUELLER
Contributing Writer

 

Adam Tournier with Bogey

Adam Tournier with Bogey

Adam Tournier has been a professor of science at McKendree University for five years. Having his Ph. D in Physics Quantum Electronics, Adam, which is what he likes to be called by his students and faculty, teaches general science classes, such as Astronomy and Concepts in Science. Adam also teaches upper level science classes for students pursuing a physics engineering minor. Each fall semester, he likes to add a general university class for first year students called University 101, which is a general education requirement for all McKendree students. Adam’s favorite class to teach is his second semester calculus-based Physics Electricity and Magnetism.

Adam was born in upstate New York. Throughout his childhood he lived in many different places like New York, Connecticut, Scotland, Arkansas, Virginia and Michigan. He moved around every three years due to his father’s job. As a high school graduate, he attended the University of Michigan on a full wrestling scholarship. By the middle of his second semester his first year, he was asked to leave due to academic reasons. He left, but decided that school was still important to him, so he attended a community college for a semester. Adam then applied again and got asked to come back to University of Michigan, however, flunked out for a second time. After this back and forth nonsense, Adam was ready to get his life figured out.

He wrestled for the fun of it at a community college for six years. Finally, he decided to attend University of Missouri-St. Louis to finish out his undergraduate classes. Once he got his undergraduate done, Adam taught at a number of different colleges while in graduate school, did research for the Department of Defense, originally planning to work with the Army or Navy, but the semester after graduate school, he picked up a full time teaching load for a term and was hooked. To get his doctorate in Physics Quantum Electronics, he attended University of Missouri-Rolla, now known as Missouri S&T.

Dr. Tournier, aside from his desire to teach, had many interesting jobs to get him through different points of his life. He worked on a fishing boat in Alaska for many years, worked as a carpenter, worked security and manager at many night clubs, as well as a DJ on The Point, an FM radio station in St. Louis. One memory he has during his radio career is when Howard Stern first came to St. Louis and was interviewed on a different radio station, 104.4 Alice. Adam explained how he faked press credentials on the radio to convince them to let him ask Howard questions live. He then got on the air and started to promote The Point, his radio station, instead of the one that he was live on. The producers on the set were not too happy about that one. At his peak, Adam’s show had one million listeners. “I miss being on the radio. It was fun,” he explains.

Adam is volunteer assistant coach for the Women’s Wrestling team, which is a new, up and coming sport added to McKendree last year and even new in many NCAA schools in general. Adam is in charge of keeping the athletes on both the men’s and women’s wrestling teams at McKendree on their academic toes. He runs the study tables for the teams, which is a required study time for the athletes to attend once or twice a week to make sure their grades are up and make sure they stay eligible to wrestle before and during their season. Adam still enjoys getting on the mats to wrestle with the McKendree men’s team. His knowledge about wrestling is also prominent. Even if they are still young, he’s still putting up a good fight.

Having resided in Illinois since 2006, he has enjoyed teaching and coaching wrestling at McKendree University and around the area of Lebanon. Adam demonstrates great passion for both of these things that he ultimately loves to do every day of his life. He also mentioned that working eight and half months a year isn’t too bad either. “Life can’t get any easier than that,” Adam says. In 2013, Adam applied for and received tenure, so he is here to stay.

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A Chandelier Dropping Experience

BY LAUREN APETZ
Staff Writer

I attended this musical on March 3 at the Fox Theatre through the McKendree University Honors program. Through this program I was able to get to go see this musical

Playbill

Playbill

for free. I had seen the movie so I thought I had an idea of what was going to happen, but I was still amazed and surprised about how great the performance was.
I was so mesmerized by the set due to its beauty and the many surprises it held. There were moving stairs, fire, explosions, and the grand chandelier drop over the audience, which I was something I was not expecting. The way the staging was designed, the audience was sometimes actually a part of the performance and they even had actors out in the audience. Having this kind of involvement makes a musical so much more engaging.
The Phantom of the Opera is a very vocally demanding musical. It was written by Andrew Llyod Webber for his wife Sarah Brightman, who is a very talented soprano singer. The part of Christine was played by Katie Travis and she did a

Actress Katie Travis with The Phantom

Actress Katie Travis with The Phantom

fantastic job. Local theatre goers may recognize her from Les Miserables at the Muny. She hit every high note with such ease, it made me feel like such an inadequate soprano. The part of the Phantom was played by understudy Eric Ruiz, originally supposed to be Chris Mann who was a contestant on The Voice. Ruiz also did a great job of portraying the emotional turmoil that is the phantom through song.
I highly recommend this musical to anyone who wants to be genuinely entertained and to be sent for a trip on an emotional rollercoaster.

 

Visit http://www.thephantomoftheopera.com/ustour/ for ticket information!
Photo Cred: Phantom US Tour Twitter Page

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McKendree Share Your Story

BY TAQUISHA DRISDELL
Assistant Editor

       McKendree Share Your Story is a play which was a part of Global Awareness Week at McKendree University. The unique play was directed by Michelle Magnussen and the theater department. The play had a cast of twelve actors who are students at the university. The cast members were Taylor Anderson, Mignon Biggs, Victoria Day, Joshua Fleming, Tyler W. Jewell, Carliann Huelsmann, Adam Kaul, Logun Norris, Dakota Reed, Shaniese Tally, Chloe this, Natalie Van Booven. The concept of the play was for the cast to tell different stories about the experiences various students have had at McKendree University. The set of the play was created to mimic different areas of the campus. For example, they had the tables and chairs that are used in 1828, they had the big couches that are used in Piper Lounge and they even had a bed and desk to make it look like a dorm room. They started the play by having one student come out and tell a small portion of how they felt when they first moved into their dorms or even if they were a commuter how they felt when they first stepped onto campus. Each cast member would rotate in and out, with a new story as the play continued. The set also had pictures of the buildings and of the statues that are placed around campus to represent McKendree. They shared the stories about dating in college and how sometimes young girls get carried away. Another story that was shared was how some students get to college and go wild because they was always monitored by their parents. So when they finally are able to be on their own they act out by not going to class, partying a lot and getting into trouble. Some more stories they shared were the stories about McKendree being haunted and how they had experiences with the ghost. One of the cast members even shared how they saw one of the ghost in their dorm room one night while she was doing homework. Overall, it was a good play and it was well produced and directed.

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Spinning to Success: The McKendree Color and Winter Guard

BY LEAH CUMMINS
Contributing Writer

Many students on campus are highly involved with McKendree and play various sports as well as join many organizations. One organization many students do not know much about is the color guard and winter guard programs at McKendree University. The color guard is part of the Marching Bearcat Band (MBB), and every member is a McKendree student. The winter guard, on the other hand, is a separate program that is affiliated with McKendree called Avidity Independent Winter Guard.

As a MBB color guard member, I have practice three times a week, and we perform at every football game and other exhibition performances. We spin flags to music the band plays while performing and keeping formations. Because we learn new routines each week, our choreography is not very difficult; it mainly complements the marching band’s music and shows school spirit! Becoming a member of the color guard was one of my best decisions as a student at McKendree because I met an amazing team of people who share my passion! Moving in early was another perk because I spent a week with my team and felt more confident during the first week of school since I knew 21 other teammates.

To actually understand color guard, it helps to know its background history. Originating from the military, soldiers carried a flag with their colors on it. Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) drill teams also commonly used fake rifles and would spin them. The original color guards had flags and rifles, but did not incorporate much choreography or themes into their performances.

Today, however, color guard is an art, much like Dance Theater, and it includes show themes, costumes and show makeup. Modern color guard spins flags that are six feet tall, rifles that are 2-5 pounds, and dull metal sabres. Flags have colorful silks which coordinate with the theme of the choreography. Dancing, hence the choreography, is also a huge of color guard, and we use movement to portray our theme and add to our equipment’s routine.

Dance, flags, sabres and rifles are all common in winter guard shows. Winter Guard International (WGI) is the biggest circuit for winter guard. The difference between winter and color guard is that color guards accompany marching bands, and winter guards perform in a gymnasium with a decorated tarp floor to recorded music. Winter guard can be more demanding because there is no wind, sun or rain in the way. The winter guard team at McKendree is very successful. We practice from September to April almost every single weekend for 10+ hours at minimum. Some weekends, we rehearse for 20 hours or more. We do not rehearse during the weekdays because we have team members traveling from as far as Kansas City away to join our team. Because the team is just affiliated with McKendree, anyone can join.

Avidity Independent won a silver medal in Independent Open last year at WGI World Championships, making them 2nd in the world in their division. This award also bumped the team up into the highest division in the circuit, Independent World. McKendree also has a second team, which is in the Independent A division. For independent groups (not high school groups) there is “A”, “Open” and “World.” It is a huge honor to make the World team, and I am thankful for the opportunity to join this year! To join either team, auditions are a three day process, and anyone from the area can attend. The benefits of being a McKendree student include scholarships and a guaranteed spot on one of the teams!

Overall, the McKendree color guard and winter guard teams are great programs that are not very well known. Color guard members are more than just ‘flag twirlers’ and have interesting aspects just like theater and dance. WGI is called Sport of the Arts for many reasons, including the variety of performances and skills which color guard brings to the table.

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The Madness in March

BY ASHLY SCHMITT
Staff Writer

No wonder why the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men’s and Women’s basketball tournament is named, “March Madness”. Its been going on since 1908 causing basketball fans all over the world literally go mad and cause chaos over the brackets.   This month marks the sit on the edge of your seat throughout all of the games mentality.

There are 68 of the teams playing throughout this time with the weight of single elimination hanging over their shoulders. The brackets are set up by rankings, but we all know these rankings lead to upsets. Threes always those people who want to root for the underdog! The playing and hype goes on for three weeks. The heavily weighted games comes the next two weeks, when it is down to the Sweet Sixteen. Then the teams get trimmed down until there are the Final Four. The Final Four won’t play until April, so it’s quite a long ongoing madness.

Fans go crazy for the semifinal and final championships packing the gym decked out in their team’s colors. Rivalries get extra heated, so it gets ugly whenever Duke plays North Carolina or Kentucky plays Louisville and so on. There is over a 20 picture photo stream titled, “Wacky fans of March Madness” dedicated just for those fans going over the top packing the gyms for these games.

This year we had Kentucky and Wisconsin to play off in the Final Four. They were both the number 1 ranked teams in their separate brackets. Needless to mention that Kentucky was on a 38 game winning streak and was games away from a perfect, legendary season. On the other side, we had Duke and Gonzaga, the first and second seed of their brackets along with Michigan State, which was seated 7th. The Final Four was on April 4th followed by the championship April 6th.

 

 

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McK Cheerleading Team at Nationals

BY EMILY DOERSAM
Contributing Writer

On April 7, 2015, the McKendree Cheerleading squad made their way to Daytona, Florida to compete in the 2015 NCA College Cheerleading Nationals. They competed in prelims at the Ocean Center on April 9. After speaking with head coach Bianca Timmerman, I learned quite a few things about this year’s team and this year’s competition.

There are 45 cheerleaders, but only 20 of them compete. Although only 20 compete, every cheerleader has the opportunity to go and support the team. Each cheerleader has to attend all practices, maintain a 2.0 GPA, and must be a full time student. They will be going to Daytona with 32 cheerleaders.

Getting to where the team is now hasn’t been an easy feat. I spoke with Coach

China Rongey

China Rongey

Timmerman and asked her how it was possible for them to get to Nationals. She responded with “School funds, boosters, donations, and fundraisers all help pay for the trip. The squad had to attend a camp earlier in the year and display/perform skills taught there. At the end of the camp there was a miniature competition where we had the chance to earn bids to Nationals. We got one!” Her national’s team practices five days a week for at least three hours. They’ve put in a lot of work, including a 35 hour choreography weekend and giving up their spring break. This squad has really shown their dedication.

After finding out all of the details about the trip, I asked Coach Timmerman some questions about her personal thoughts on the team. I asked her what the biggest struggle was going to be and her response was “The biggest struggle for us is consistency. The team has all the skills and drive they need to hit this routine, but they’re not consistent yet. I would say confidence is another thing. This is by far the hardest routine I’ve been a part of, including when I cheered, and this team knows they need confidence too. They need to just understand and execute everything they know to gain the confidence in themselves that all of us coaches have in them.” Her opinion on how the team will do has been well

China Rongey

China Rongey

thought out. Like any coach does, you have to look at every aspect. She says that “I cannot speak for the team, but what I am excited for is for this team to go down and own it. If we hit this routine, we will be nothing but successful. This team has the potential to take home big placements at Nationals. I’m excited for them to experience what college cheer is about and to finally get recognition for what they do! If the squad pushes their limits, breathes, hits the routine, and displays confidence, this team will definitely come home with some hardware and maybe even something sparkly!”

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Cardinals face a tough road in National League

BY WILL BASLER
Sports Editor

Google Images

Google Images

After a fairly successful 2014 campaign, the Cardinals fell in the National League Championship Series, falling just short of the World Series. The departure of key contributors Joe Kelly and Allen Craig gave the team a much different crew looking forward to the 2015 season. However, Cardinals management surprised many throughout the sports world when the swapped young starting pitcher Shelby Miller for Braves outfielder Jason Heyward. The Redbirds had a surplus of good, young arms, and a lineup that was starving for runs. This trade took care of that, and the improved Cardinals are ready to compete for their twelfth world championship.

However, other teams in the NL Central have upgraded as well. The most notable of these upgrades came from the Chicago Cubs. Last season, the Cubs limped to a 73-win season, which was good enough to place last in the division. This offseason, the team added all-star pitcher Jon Lester in free agency, along with veteran outfielder Dexter Fowler. The current crop of young players are now a year older, and fans should see the debut of infield phenom Kris Bryant, who hit 43 home runs in the minor leagues last season, who split time between AA and AAA.

The Pittsburgh Pirates lost catcher Russell Martin to Toronto in free agency, but will get a full season from rookie talent Gregory Polanco. AJ Burnett also returns to the team after a disappointing season in Philadelphia, so their rotation should be more stable this year. Any team with a year-in and year-our MVP candidate like Andrew McCutcheon will consistently be a good squad, and 2015 does not look to be any different. The Cincinnati Reds still have a few MVP-level talents in Joey Votto and Brandon Phillips, as well, and will look to contend once again.

In the West, the contenders from last year will be back. The San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers are both stacked with talent. The west has the MVP and the most dominant pitcher in the game Clayton Kershaw, and the returning champions in San Francisco. The San Diego Padres even added all-star talent in Matt Kemp. Much like the central, the west has improved as well.

Through all of this, the Washington Nationals may be the best team in the national league. They had the best record in the league a year ago, and added one of the best pitchers in baseball, Max Scherzer. The Atlanta Braves and the New York Mets should both be improved, but this division will likely earn only one playoff spot.

The Cardinals rode their good pitching to the playoffs, with their lineup limping along, trying to keep up. Matt Carpenter and Matt Holliday both posted career lows at the plate, while Yadier Molina missed much of the season due to injury. Kolten Wong underwhelmed in his rookie year, but started to hit well after the all-star break and was one of the best performers in the playoffs. The playoff emergence of rookie Randal Grichuk will help ease the loss, from a competitive standpoint, of Oscar Taveras. Jason Heyward adds a proven major league talent in the outfield and the lineup, and should put up better season numbers now that he isn’t playing eighty games in hitter-unfriendly Turner Field in Atlanta.

Probable Lineup

  1. 3B – Carpenter
  2. RF – Heyward
  3. LF – Holliday
  4. 1B – Adams
  5. SS – Peralta
  6. C – Molina
  7. 2B – Wong
  8. CF – Jay

 

Starting Rotation

  1. Wainwright
  2. Lynn
  3. Lackey
  4. Wacha
  5. Martinez

Overall, look for the Cardinals to be back in the pennant race once again. They are one of the most talented teams in the league, and if the lineup performs to its capabilities this year, there will be a new World Series champion in October – the St. Louis Cardinals.

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[2014-2015] Vol. 93, Iss. 11 The Review Crew

 

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Vol. 93, Iss. 11

Editors

Emily Lucia
Editor-in-Chief

Taquisha Drisdell
Assistant Editor 

Lauren Apetz
Media Editor

Will Basler
Sports Editor

Editing Team

Emily Lucia
Taquisha Drisdell

In This Issue

Eric Abrolat
Cheyenne Autry
Donna Bick
Will Basler
Jennifer Blumberg
Kendra Brackman
Rebecca McKee
Malie Mills
Ashly Schmitt
Spencer Sweetin
Mileena Tomasek
Natalie Van Booven

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions,
which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in
Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at
701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
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“Leditors” from the Editor

EMILY LUCIA

Editor in Chief

Well here it is. The first print issue for the semester. I have to be honest, I was a little worried we would not have gotten many articles. But as people sent them in, the less worried I felt. I want to thank all of the writers who appeared in this edition for submitting your stories. A school paper would be nothing without the students, so thank you. In addition, I would also like to thank McKendree’s faculty for supporting The Review. Without the support of people who constantly inspire the students on this campus, this paper would not be half of what it is. It is a truly beautiful thing to see students show so much interest in sending in articles. As a writer and someone who loves reading, it excites me to see such interest. It shows a willingness to learn and a willingness to keep up with what is going on, not only in the world, but on this happy, little campus of McKendree. Once again thank you to everyone who wrote articles for this edition.
If you have questions or comments, or would like to submit articles feel free to email us at mckreview@mckendree.edu.

Happy reading!

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A Call for Change: The Rhoda Warner Story

By Emily Lucia

Editor in Chief

 

It all began with the planning of a peace walk, inspired by the events in Ferguson, Mo. The walk was meant to bring the students of all nationalities and ethnicities together. It was to show that McKendree is one, united by learning. On Oct. 29, 2014, what was meant to be something completely harmless, turned into something that would cause a rift among students on campus. Rhoda Warner, a junior at McKendree University, had found her car vandalized.

The walk was originally planned as an interfaith event, but Warner had another idea for this school year’s walk. “Years before we had done the walk on an interfaith level, we just gathered with people of different faiths. And I thought, why don’t we just open it up to the community?” Inspired by the race related events that took place in Ferguson, Mo, Warner wanted to bring the community together, not just on a faith level, but on a level of ethnic diversity. She had spoken with Rev. Tim Harrison and several other faculty members about it, and they were open to this idea.

“We had a meeting with the [Lebanon] Chief of Police and [McKendree] Public Safety to show that unity between officials and students of all cultures, not just African Americans,” Warner explained.

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Image by Rhoda Warner

Eventually the Ferguson events were pushed from the plans for the peace walk, and she began to wonder why. “It began to dwell on me, and I kept thinking ‘Why? Why did that have to be excluded?’” After thinking about her questions for a while, Warner soon had an answer. Race. Many will agree that discussing race, as a topic, is difficult. Through the years, race in America has been a topic in which many do not talk about in public because it is such a sensitive subject.

“Talking about race relations, talking about diversity in general, when it boils down to it, is hard,” Warner explained further. “I looked back at the beginning of the semester when all the Mike Brown stuff was happening, they had a forum [on campus]. Not many students showed up, not many faculty showed up; it was more so—the people that take initiative on campus.”

As a college, it is important for these types of events to be held, to better the learning and understanding about what is going on in the world around us. The forums, like the one held concerning the Mike Brown Case, are designed to get the students talking and engaged to find a common ground. Warner, the president of several student organizations as well as a Resident Assistant, felt that the target audience for this forum was not supposed to be the students and faculty who were already engaged in what was unfolding around them, but the students and faculty who dared to shy away from the topic of diversity and race relations. “We are on the campus to do those types of things, to get uncomfortable—to start having those conversations. That’s why we’re here. We’re not here to stay the same as when we came in [as freshmen].”

Warner began to talk to her fellow classmates to see what they thought could be done about this idea of averting conversations about race and diversity. “I am an African-American female, so I obviously identify with my African-American counterparts. But I am also in a lot leadership positions, so I identify a lot with my Caucasian counterparts, my Hispanic counterparts and all of the other ethnic groups on campus because I am involved in so many different things,” she said. “However, I look back at the conversations that my other counterparts would have with me in certain areas and I realized that they don’t mix well with each other.” Warner further explained that no one talks about why there are not more discussions about avoiding the race discussion or what mindset is behind not discussing this controversial topic. The conversation, she believes, should be started in the classrooms and from there, take flight to the dorm rooms, the lounges and then into the real world. After much more thought, she met with Dr. Jonie Bastian and presented her ideas. “There has to be people to start the conversations.” Together, Warner and Dr. Bastian began to work out ideas and form a plan on how this discussion could begin on campus. Eventually they came together with Christine Bahr and several other members of the faculty to discuss a possible game plan to change this problem.

“The students don’t really see what is going on because they’re here for four years and they leave, the faculty are here longer. They see what is going on,” Warner said.
After much discussion, they concluded that the reason behind not having “the conversation” was that McKendree students come from all over the world. Many are from small towns where there is not much diversity and are not quite sure how to react to race, then there are the students from the big cities like Chicago, St. Louis and more, who are completely use to the idea of having a diverse group of students in the same room. They agreed to take this issue to the students. Warner decided that it would be a good idea to speak with the Student Government Association. She attended a meeting and presented her ideas, but the response was not what she expected. “They decided to keep it at a general diversity aspect, which is a good idea, but they were not including race. Not just black and white, but Hispanic as well as the international students,” Warner stated.
It was after that SGA meeting that incidents began to happen. There had been a nasty post on the popular social media app Yik-Yak, but that was only the beginning. A few days after the SGA meeting, Warner was walking to Bothwell Chapel for a meeting. “There were a group of Caucasian men walking, and I walked past them, saying excuse me as I passed. As I walked by them one of them [made a racist comment].” Warner was utterly surprised. “I had never experience something like that. I thought ‘surely they aren’t talking about me?’’’ She was little bit ahead of them when she looked back at them, and the men had been laughing as they entered another building. Warner then went Dr. Bastian, who asked if she knew these students. When she responded no, Warner explained that it was probably because of the issue that she had been speaking about as well as the color of her skin that allowed these men to say such terrible things to her.

The incidents did not stop there. At one point two men followed Warner to her car. For two weeks, these types of incidents happened back to back causing Warner to worry.

“I was suddenly caught in a whirlwind of stuff. It wasn’t even a big deal to me. The more I would think about it, I though sure this was something that I thought other students would think needed to be changed. This is a school that we love and if we are graduating, we need to be citizens of the world, not only citizens of where we came from,” Warner explained.

It was then that incident involving her car occurred. “As soon as I walked outside I saw something bleeding. One my residents came outside, and I fell back. I didn’t know how to feel at this point. I was numb.” Warner then called Public Safety, her R.D. came out to help out as well. Students began to gather to see what had happened to her car. “They didn’t understand how something like this could happen here, even though this kind of thing is happening everywhere. It happened, and it is happening, so how could we not fathom that something like this was happening here?”

When she arrived on campus, everyone was questioning her, asking if she was all right. “It felt like it was happening to someone else,” Warner reflected. “It felt like a defense mechanism, but I felt that I had to move on. I had to continue my routine.”
As if that was not enough, Warner began to receive major backlash from her fellow students. “They would say things like ‘This is what you wanted? You wanted to get people talking so now they’re talking.’” Tensions within the African- American community began to rise as well. “They saw me as the poster child of what was happening.”

What had started out as a simple idea to harmlessly discuss the differences amongst the students and even the human race grew into a conflict that was completely misunderstood. “It wasn’t even an issue of black and white, it was simply to talk about our differences.”
“The whole experience was really hard. But through it all, I was thinking that I feel sorry for the person who did that to me. They say it is a hate crime, but I say that it was a crime of the mind. Because if you don’t have that worldview or an open mind-that compassion, thinking the way someone else would think about something then you are the one who has been done wrong. You didn’t do anything wrong to me.”

Returning to school after winter break, Warner discovered that things had died down as far as the tensions about race were concerned. While she was glad her name was finally out of the spotlight, she was troubled to find that everything was as it had been before the whole debacle. “It was as if the whole idea of inclusion and diversity just sort of died off.” Warner explained. She began to think of what could be done on campus, to keep these conversations alive and of what could be done to open the minds of McKendree students and faculty to the idea of diversity.

When asked why people are so closed minded to the idea of diversity and ethnicity, she said that she could not explain it, just that there are people who do not understand the idea and choose not to understand the idea. “That is where the anger comes from. You have the people who are so passionate about what they stand for, and that group is upset that the non-passionate group does not care or want to care.”
She believes that in order to fix this issue that it should be up to the student leaders and faculty to inspire other students to open their minds to the diversity. She says that it should be a group of people, not an individual, who needs to take the initiative in making this idea of ethnic diversity into a reality.

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Image by Rhoda Warner

Warner chose not to dwell on who the vandals might be but instead focused on “the what and the why” and decided to not make it personal. “I felt that if I personalized it, then that anger and rage would come out and I would still have to come to class, I still would have to interact with people, I would become a shell if I thought about who it could have been,” she explained. “I refuse to be a victim, and I refuse to be an angry victim. I love McKendree, and I love the people of McKendree, and I didn’t want that to tarnish the school because of something like that.”

While she views the world in a different way now, she puts her passion first, and it gives her a whole new passion. It is her passion for change that fuels her courage to move forward, and it is something to be admired.
“It’s not done,” Warner enlightened, “This is just the beginning.”

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Dr. Patterson: Mondern Day Gibson Girl

Dr. Martha Patterson

Dr. Martha Patterson

By Donna Bick

Staff Writer

Martha Patterson, Ph.D. is an English professor at McKendree University and has been teaching on campus since 2004. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Carleton College in Northfield, Minn.; her Master of Arts degree in literary studies and her Ph.D. in English from the University of Iowa. Her teaching and research interests include American late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century studies, women’s studies and African American literature and culture.

Along with her impressive teaching credentials, Dr. Patterson is a talented, skillful author. She has penned a monograph titled, Beyond the Gibson Girl: Reimagining the American New Woman. Her monograph was a revision of her dissertation, a requirement for the Ph.D. It is showcased in the large display case in the front of PAC 222. She has also edited a collection of essays titled, “The American New Woman Revisited: A Reader, 1894-1930.” In the works, is another book, titled The Harlem Renaissance Weekly, which is a study of major themes in Harlem Renaissance literature through the lens of four African American weekly newspapers. Furthermore, if you visit her online profile on the McKendree website, you will see a list of awards she has won, such as a Fulbright Research/Teaching Award to Norway, University of Agder, 2010. She also has a list of accomplishments under her Administrative and Professional Service that is a must see.

 

Dr. Patterson has an impressive repertoire of accomplishments, but what is also remarkable about Dr. Patterson is that she is like a stick of dynamite ready to teach you American Literature in a way that makes you long for more. Although other students may not like the massive amount of reading required, her students are certain to learn. The information taught and extracted out from the reading ensures students that Dr. Patterson is well prepared and well educated. When asked where Dr. Patterson obtains some of her information, she mentioned The Poetry Foundation, and when asked specifically about her insight into Emily Dickenson, whose poetry was studied and examined in class, Dr. Patterson pulled out a 4-inch thick folder filled with information on Emily Dickenson’s writings.

Of the many discussion topics Dr. Patterson has taught, one was the portrayal of The New Woman in literature. The Gibson Girl progressed in the late 1890s to the early 1900s as an independent, athletic, talented and well-educated white woman (sound familiar?) who changed the mold of the stereotypical submissive woman of previous years. In one of Dr. Patterson’s classes, students read “Alexander’s Bridge by Willa Cather, “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “Roman Fever” by Edith Wharton and “Maggie: A Girl of the Street” by Stephen Crane. All of these short stories and novels give readers a vision of how the American New Woman emerges in various forms and evolves over time.

In “Alexander’s Bridge,” Cather mimics the true events of the 1907 Quebec Bridge collapse, in which more than 70 workers died. Where the American New Woman enters this short story is as the bridge builder’s mistress, Hilda Burgoyne. Hilda represents the American New Women due to her lifestyle in this time period. She is independent, earning her own living as a singer/entertainer. “The Yellow Wallpaper” is a fascinating read due to its bizarre nature of the narrator, Jane; a late 19th century woman who through journal writing, chronicles her life and confinement and describes how her yellow wallpaper slowly consumes her. Furthermore, women of this time were commonly identified with what is called a temporary nervous depression. And because of this diagnosis, women were routinely isolated with no mental or physical stimulation which brought about hysteria, and in “The Yellow Wallpaper” Jane becomes consumed with her yellow wallpaper and believes it comes alive with women behind the wallpaper reaching out to her. Jane’s imagination and desires are stifled by her husband, a physician. He views her as weak and feeble-minded, which in this time period was not uncommon. The story illustrates the effects of confinement on women and how it affects their mental health.

Other literature discussed was by authors, William Faulkner and Richard Wright. Students may have difficulty reading some of the dialogue in As I Lay Dying by Faulkner, but Dr. Patterson has a way of clarifying the many plot points that may be missed by the average student reader.  Also, the way Dr. Patterson taught Richard Wright’s, “Native Son” was enlightening because this novel provides a graphic representation of life for the African American as well as how Bigger Thomas, the novel’s protagonist, views white people. The novel also portrays how white people view life at this time from their perspective, not the African American’s perspective. I highly recommend reading Native Son whether you take her class or not as there is so much more to take in in this novel.

The movie, “Ethnic Notions” shown in class traces the deep-rooted stereotypes which have fueled anti-black prejudice. According to IMDb, terms like “Loyal Toms,” the “carefree Sambos,” “Mammies,” “savage Brutes” and “wide-eyed Pickaninnies” were described and caricatured in the film. These images were featured in “cartoons, feature films, popular songs, minstrel shows, advertisements, folklore, household artifacts and children’s rhymes. These dehumanizing caricatures permeated popular culture from the 1820s to the Civil Rights period and implanted themselves deep in the American psyche” (IMDb).

Much can be learned about African American history and culture through Dr. Patterson’s American Literature classes. While the unrest in Ferguson, Mo. was in the headlines with the shooting of Michael Brown, Dr. Patterson encouraged and discussed personal thoughts from the class about this unsettling situation, and students gained differing perspectives.

Another novel discussed was The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and Song of Myself by Walt Whitman. Dr. Patterson’s passion for American Literature radiates as she is both engaging and informative. So much knowledge is gained from Dr. Patterson’s instruction. I highly recommend her classes to other students.

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Will it Ever End?

By Ashly Schmitt

Contributing Writer

The problems in Ferguson, Mo. have yet to die down since the Michael Brown incident took place on Aug. 9, 2014.  The news has been filled with endless stories of riots and disturbances that have dispersed attention throughout the United States.  The shooting has been such a popular topic since then, to the point where you have to live under a rock not to hear about it.  Everybody has their different opinions about how the Ferguson Police Department handled the situation; the officer, Darren Wilson, stated it was self-defense against a criminal.  Throughout the months there has been protesters setting fires and protests in other major cities such as Philadelphia, Chicago, Minneapolis, Boston and more.  Of course most of us saw these protests on the news and social media.

Just weeks ago two, police officers were shot after a protest in Ferguson.  Twenty-year-old Jeffrey Williams was arrested with having a handgun matching the shell casings from the shooting.  The first officer was shot under his eye, the other in his shoulder. Fortunately, they were both released from medical care the following week. This disturbance puts the Ferguson Police Department in a horrible situation as they support a protest that is nonviolent and peaceful, but this disruptive act may set the acceptance back.

All of these events have large impacts on Ferguson. The town’s residents live feeling uneasy about their safety.  Businesses have been on the downfall or even destroyed by the endless protesters.  Police officers are obviously not safe in their everyday lives.  The popular slogans for the uprising are “Black Lives Matter” but also “Cops’ Lives Matter”.  Both sides of the matter are extremely persistent. It’s hard to see an end to all the protests anytime soon.

Do you find this situation ironic?  This protester was marching against police brutality and saying stop killing us, yet would kill an officer.  Some protests are even ruining the chance at making a living for their neighbors with business in an area that is chosen for demonstrations.  We are all rooting for a quick solution, but we will just have to wait and see the outcome over time.

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Play Me a Song Piano Man

By Lauren Apetz

Contributing Writer

Dr. Joseph Welch

Dr. Joseph Welch

A piano has 88 keys. You could play these keys in chopsticks style, or you could learn how to master the art of playing the piano. Dr. Joseph Welch could get you there. Dr. Welch has been an adjunct faculty member for two years at McKendree, but his experience as a pianist has gone on much longer than that. Dr. Welch has more than 15 years under his belt.

His piano career began with conducting his stuffed animal orchestra in elementary school. Welch would putz around on the keyboard for a while before his parents finally got him professional training. As soon as he began playing, he knew he wanted to be a pianist. He has dabbled with other instruments, but he says, laughing at himself, “You don’t want me to play those.”

Listening to Dr. Welch play the piano is quite an amazing experience. Welch graduated the University of Minnesota with the ability to coach and accompany vocalists. The spring semester brings a plethora of opportunities for students to witness not only his amazing performance skills but also his great skills as a teacher. Welch will be putting on a master class on March 3 for advanced students who apply. But everyone who wants to learn from Welch doesn’t have to be an advanced student; Welch also teaches beginning level students. At the end of this semester, his students will put on a concert on April 20, with talent ranging from beginners to experienced. Another way to experience Welch’s piano playing is in his spring recital Feb. 24, in which he plays a variety of pieces dealing with the ups and downs and longevity of love. “I love this recital because of the variety of pieces. Each piece is a different example of what happens in relationships, but in the end we find out that love endures all things.”

The Recital

I attended Dr. Welch’s recital, and Love Endures All Things was truly amazing. The stage was set, and Dr. Welch sat in the middle and played. One of the pieces included a tenor, a soprano and a violin player. When asked about how much they practiced, Welch chuckled in reply, “Well, the violinist and I practiced twice since we had a lot pieces to play together. The soprano and the tenor – we practiced right before the show; I had just sent them the music and trusted that they would learn it, and they did.” The recital with all of them went off without a hitch. The voices and the piano blended wonderfully and was well received by the crowd.

For each piece, Welch played there was a different theme, and the reasons why each song was written was explained in the program. From a song that was a wedding present to an observation of love these songs really went along with the theme of love. Before one of the pieces there was a quote from Everybody Loves Raymond about love and marriage, and what was the key to making marriage work.

There was a good turnout to his concert, and there was a variety of people who attended the event. His concert received a much deserved standing ovation. If you did not attend, you missed out on a fine night of the fine arts.

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The Duck: Background Story of Benjamin Duckworth

By Spencer Sweetin

Contributing Writer

Benjamin Duckworth

Benjamin Duckworth

Every foundation has a base – something that holds it in place so it does not give way. To the McKendree men’s and women’s volleyball teams, that base is Ben Duckworth. Assistant coach to Nickie Sanlin, Duckworth brings a sizeable amount of volleyball knowledge to the program from coaching the St. Louis High Performance Volleyball Club since 2006. The expertise that he brought has strengthened me and my teammate’s talents greatly.

Duckworth started playing volleyball at the age of 15 at the suggestion of a senior varsity men’s volleyball team player at Oakville Senior High School. He told him to play on a club team so he could start playing at a more competitive level. Little did that senior know that Ben would go on to be player of the year in Missouri his senior year and receive the All Conference title his senior year of college at Indiana-Purdue Fort Wayne.

Most are unaware of how Ben’s success influenced the life of his younger brother, Jake Duckworth who is currently playing for the Lindenwood Lions in his sophomore year. When asked about this, Ben said, “I never told Jake that he had to play volleyball. The drive to play the sport was from coming to all my games in high school and college. I mean, when he was thirteen and I was in the Final Four, he was peppering (a warm up in volleyball including two individuals) between matches with All Americans. The drive to play volleyball was being subconsciously instilled in him.”

Onto the more important question, who is better? “You know, I’ll go ahead and be that guy and say that I’m better. However, I’d also say that we are two very different players in many aspects”.

The Duckworths both played volleyball in St. Louis but in two different eras of the sport. I asked Ben to comment on how things have changed since he played. “While I’ll say the number of high quality players has dropped since then, the sport is much bigger now. I’ll also say that private schools used to dominate everyone else, and now that has shifted within the past three years to public schools”.

All this talk of St. Louis begs the question of how Duckworth came into contact with McKendree University. Nickie Sanlin, the head men’s and women’s volleyball coach, knew Ben prior to being associated with McKendree through the St. Louis High Performance Volleyball Club.  High Performance is a massive club with two travel teams per age group (thirteen to eighteen years old) and around five regionals teams per year. But Sanlin still picked Duckworth out among all those prospective assistant coach candidates. Duckworth said he got to know her much better from the tightly knit high-level adult volleyball community that is in St. Louis. The community of adults that Duckworth refers to only pick people that are related to High Performance and can compete at a high level of play. The two frequently talked at those small event days, and Sanlin found a great respect for Ben’s knowledge of the game.

Sanlin and Duckworth teamed up to conquer the MIVA conference with the men and the GLVC conference with the women. Duckworth plays a key leadership role in making both teams run smoothly, and without Duck, the players would have no one to follow.

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Which Way: Will His Future Take Him?

 

Photo courtesy Devon VanNote

Photo courtesy Devon VanNote

By Eric Abrolat

Contributing Writer

The road to a student’s future career may have a few curves or bends, but it tends to straighten out, allowing him or her to move forward with one goal in mind. However, for Devon VanNote, a sophomore at McKendree University, his road continues to fork off into two directions – a musical direction and an academic direction. VanNote is an avid gamer, a passionate guitarist and a dedicated computer science undergrad. There is not a moment of his week that isn’t filled with homework, gaming or playing in his band. When thinking about his future, he still doesn’t know what he will end up doing.

VanNote’s interest in computer science originally stemmed from his love for video games. Not a day goes by where he doesn’t read about or play a videogame. Moving forward, he hopes to combine his two interests. With his computer science degree, he aspires to be a game designer or developer, holding particular interest in creating in-game environments. To better his chances of getting hired for such a job, VanNote works at the computer lab in Clark Hall. He is a student tutor to those needing any assistance in computer science courses and as well as works a web page developer for the Computer Science Department. This, however, starkly compares to the type of enjoyment he receives from being a part of his band.

 

VanNote has been the lead guitarist for the Pop Punk band Which Way since it was founded on May 9, 2013 and has written the guitar sections for 13 of the 16 songs they have written. Band members also include Dakota Kracht on vocals, Jacob Featherling on bass, Lucas Stanfield on drums and Brandon Niepoetter on rhythm guitar. The members of Which Way first met each other in the same Rock 101 class at Centralia High School. Ever since the class, the group has been inseparable, and their friendships have only continued to grow. Niepoetter and Featherling chose to attend McKendree University and are now both roommates with VanNote. VanNote’s favorite part about being in the band is “getting in the zone and connecting with all the guys on stage during a live performance.” Those live performances are opening acts and occur on a weekly basis during the summer and a biweekly basis during the winter. His favorite concert venues are Pop’s, Fubar and The Firebird. He has also performed at McKendree for two tailgates and for the Fall Festival.

VanNote “thoroughly [enjoys] playing,” stating that “it’s something that a lot of people don’t get the opportunity to do.” VanNote has received all his inspiration through his long-time favorite band, Tonight Alive, and it is his goal to play with them one day. He really enjoys listening to their music and attending their concerts, and he hopes he can one day bring that same amount of enjoyment to people listening to him play. So far, however, VanNote’s greatest achievement in his musical career is finishing second in The Battle for Pointfest, the gateway to playing in a large outdoor rock music festival held at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in St. Louis.

Photo Courtesy of Devon VanNote

Photo Courtesy of Devon VanNote

Knowing that a record deal is hard to come by and that a degree can be finished at a later date, VanNote said he “would drop out of school in a heartbeat if the opportunity of a record deal presented itself.” Regardless of what happens, VanNote knows that “performing will always be something on the side if [he doesn’t] actually go anywhere with it.” He refuses to end his musical career until he “breaks a hand or an arm falls off and [he] can’t play.” So, in the end, VanNote remains at his junction in life, unsure and unwilling to decide what his future will hold for him.

 

 

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To The Music of Your Soul: Auditioning for a Masters of Music and Graduate School

By Malie Mills

Contributing Writer

Compared to searching for your undergraduate degree school of choice, venturing into the world of graduate school for terminal degrees is an entirely different beast. All of your worries of reference letters, your resume, transcripts and application fees are relived when applying for graduate school. On top of all of that, music majors like myself have to prepare not only several selections of solo literature but also orchestral excerpts, etudes, scales and even prepare for sight reading pieces. Everything intimidating about auditioning – being in that very vulnerable spotlight – is brought back more intensely than ever before, and interviewing for those few studio spots is nerve-racking. Personally, however, I have found the journey of searching for that perfect graduate school for me to be extremely rewarding, despite all of the extra hard work gathering materials and preparing for auditions.

Over the past few months, I have travelled to four different graduate schools to audition for their respective Masters of Music programs for flute performance. Each school has had unique prospects about not only their own campuses but also in the huge cities surrounding each university. Currently, I have auditioned at the programs in Illinois State University, University of Kansas, University of Missouri, Columbia and Eastern Kentucky University. Now I can say I’ve seen the beautiful cities of Bloomington-Normal, IL, Lawrence, KS, Columbia, MO, and Lexington, KY and how they influence and shape each university. Simply travelling to all of these places of academia has been an adventure in and of itself. Seeing places I’ve never been to before, and exploring the world throughout my travels has been very exciting and memorable.

Google Images

Google Images

My greatest adventure of all, throughout these auditions, has been the personal growth and hard work I’ve put into my music and my flute for these programs to see. Developing as an individual through McKendree University’s many teachings and supportive professors has given me that extra piece of the puzzle to shine throughout my auditions. I have given my all to these four sets of applications, and I have been privileged enough to see all four schools in person for my auditions. After experiencing these auditions for graduate school in music, I would not change a thing. I am very glad to have chosen to go down this path in my life, and I hope to one day be in the newspapers for all of my McKendree family to see. This will be just another stepping stone to my goal of being a professional flutist. In the end, all of the support from McKendree, the struggles of gathering paperwork, even the hours upon hours of practicing each piece of music, will have been worth it.

 

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Spring is Here

By Kendra Brackman

Contributing Writer

Believe it or not, March is already here and halfway over!  With the conclusion of spring break, there are only seven weeks of classes left.  With the nice weather, it’s difficult to concentrate.  If time permits, take a study break and enjoy the outdoors.  You can even take your study session outside!  During the week, you can usually catch a baseball or softball game.  Lacrosse is also in season right now.  If sports are not your thing, maybe try taking a walk or riding a bike around Lebanon.  One of my favorite spring time activities is getting ice cream from Dairy Queen on McKendree Monday or Thursday and sitting outside to enjoy it.  Keep in mind that the quad is always open for whatever activities you and your friends would like to engage in.

I know we all have summer on the brain, but there is still a lot to do before we can officially relax.  Housing needs to be completed, classes have to be planned and you can’t forget about finals.  Planning housing is an exciting time.  It serves as a fresh start to the upcoming school year.  Don’t like your current roommates?  That’s okay, request someone else for next year.  You don’t like the dorm life?  There are plenty of other housing options.  McKendree West is available for everyone except freshmen.  Options also include Hunter Street, Monroe Street, Perryman and various off-campus places.  After housing is all figured out, classes for next fall need planned.  Choosing classes is as easy as sending your advisor a quick email to set up a meeting.  Most advisors are more than happy to help out and figure out a plan.  Take advantage of these helpful resources.

Photo by Emily Lucia

Photo by Emily Lucia

Finals, everyone’s favorite time of year.  Yes, it’s almost that time again, but after they are done, it’s summer!  Whatever you do, don’t wait until the last second to begin preparing for finals.  Your motivation and drive may be shot, but give them your all.  You’ll only thank yourself later.  For seniors, this is your last semester.  That means it’s your last finals; how exciting?!  Don’t stress too much about them.  Preparation is key.  Your professors do not want you to fail, but you have to put forth the appropriate effort.  All professors have office hours-use them.  There are also numerous tutors available.  Once again, take advantage of all of these resources.

College will come and go just like that.  Have fun, and regret nothing.  Before you know it, you will be a senior and wrapping up classes, job-hunting, and preparing yourself for the “real world.”  How scary!  For most of us, college is our last time of freedom.  Make the most of your college years, after all, everyone says they are the best; don’t prove them wrong.

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Christin Austin tackles it all

By Mileena Tomasek

Contributing Writer

Christin sits with a young boy in Haiti

Christin sits with a young boy in Haiti

Do you ever have so much going on that you’re too overwhelmed to do it all productively? Some people cannot handle the clutter of multiple activities and events, but Christin Austin actually enjoys taking on many tasks at once. Set to graduate in December of 2015, Christin not only has a lot going on in her life, but a lot going for her.

Here at McKendree University, Christin is involved with nearly every department in some way. She has been a member of the volleyball team, the debate team, the speech team, Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, the Student Panel and multiple honor societies. However, the list does not stop there, Christin is also a Student Ambassador, secretary of the Student Government Organization, an Emerging/Advanced Leader and made it on to both the Dean’s and President’s list for academics.

Even with all of these activities taking place, Christin takes time out of her busy schedule to take mission trips to Haiti every November. “I’ve gone there every year since the summer of 2012, and it has honestly just become a part of who I am,” she said. Although she enjoys going there and helping the community, she still allows it to serve as an opportunity to help her grow. She stated, “I am really hoping to work on my nursing degree and receive my LPN because it will really benefit my job in the future.”

As she graduates from McKendree University, she plans to obtain a major in political science with a legal studies minor. “I am hoping to go to graduate school at SLU law school,” she said.

Beliefs are something that is really important to Christin on her journey through life. “Everything I do and aspire to be is guided by my faith in God,” she said. She acts in kindness towards many and stays involved to ensure that she has a voice in whatever she believes in. She also states that she is dependent on love and support from her family as well as her friends.

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Divergent

By Jennifer Blumberg

Contributing Writer

Have you ever thought of what would happen to our world if we ever turned our backs on everyone? The beginning of the Divergent is just what you would imagine: a city that has been torn apart by a war, and one that left the city in distress. In the world of Divergent, the human population’s sense of control is different than our own. However, how the control is kept depends on which faction is in control.

IMDB Movie Page

IMDB Movie Page

Factions are societal divisions that classify citizens based on their aptitudes and values. The city is divided into five factions: Abnegation, Erudite, Dauntless, Amity and Candor. Abnegations are those who are selfless; they put others needs before their own. Erudites are the intelligent ones; they proclaim to be the knowledgeable ones. Dauntless are the brave ones; they are the soldiers of the city. Amity members are the peaceful ones; they are the caretakers of the land. Candor members are honest; they tend to say exactly what is on their mind. Also, there are the factionless. They failed to get into the faction they chose, and they now live on the streets in destitution. Lastly, there are a few citizens that are divergent. A divergent cannot be just one faction because they are more open-minded and cannot force themselves to be just one thing.

The movie follows Tris Prior (Shailene Woodley) as she decides which faction she wants to be in for the rest of her life; once you join a faction, you can’t ever transfer. She decides to leave her birth faction, Abnegation, for Dauntless. From the beginning, she realizes Dauntless is very different from what she had always known. The journey she takes to get to initiation is a tough one, but it has its rewarding moments. After she officially becomes a member of Dauntless, she and Four (Theo James) are faced with a big problem: they are both divergent. They then learn of a plan that Jeanine Matthews (Kate Winslet) and the Erudite faction has set up with Dauntless and are forced to try and stop it. After they stop a major part of the plan, the movie ends, and that is where Insurgent will pick up. Insurgent is the second movie based on the Divergent trilogy by Veronica Roth, and its release date for theaters was March 20.

The main characters are Tris Prior, Four Jeanine Matthews and Caleb Prior (Ansel Elgort). The actors and actresses of whom producer and director choose portrays the characters flawlessly. I do not think they could have found better actors. Also, the amount of details they put into each scene is astonishing. Everything is just the way it should be and then some. Divergent went into theaters on March 21, 2014 and came out on DVD on Aug. 5.

I definitely recommend this movie, especially if you are a science fiction fan. Also, if you are planning to see Insurgent in theaters, I recommend you re-watch Divergent. It will help refresh anything you don’t remember in the last movie before you see the new one. If Insurgent is anything like Divergent, it is sure to be one of the best movies of 2015.

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Women’s Wrestling Tag Team: Hailee Lilly and Olivia Seppani

By Natalie Van Booven

Staff Writer

For many people, the words “women” and “wrestling” go together like chicken and waffles. The very combination is mind-bending and, to say the least, odd—and the statistics bear this perception out. Nationwide, in 2012, only about three percent of wrestlers at the high school level are female. According to the National Wrestling Coaches Association, only five states (Calif., Hawaii, Mass., Texas and Wash.) sponsor a girl’s state high school championship.

At the collegiate level, however, the state of women’s wrestling is slightly different. 24 colleges and universities in Canada and the U. S. offer varsity wrestling programs. One of the schools on that list, compiled by the National Wrestling Coaches Association, is none other than McKendree University. To get a glimpse of our women’s wrestling team, I interviewed two of its members: Hailee Lilly (a junior from N. C.) and Olivia Seppini (a sophomore from Calif.).

 

HAILEE INTERVIEW

HaileeLilly

What drew you to McKendree University?

“Wrestling drew me to McKendree because, after, my freshman year at Lindenwood Belleville, my coach decided to transfer here, and I followed him. The atmosphere was a big draw as well. McKendree offers a homey feel, but at the same time has a city appeal to it.”

 

What about the atmosphere do you like?

“What I like about the atmosphere is the nurturing nature the professors here provide me. The smaller class sizes help me tremendously understand I am being taught, and the staff here at McKendree are resourceful enough to help me when I need it.”

 

How long have you been wrestling? Why did you start wrestling?

“I have been wrestling since 2009. I started wrestling because, after my freshman year, my softball coach suggested that I get involved in a winter sport to keep in shape for softball season. What better sport to pick than wrestling?”

 

Tell me a highlight of your wrestling career.

“A highlight of my wrestling career would be my freshman year, winning the WCWA National Tournament in Texas. I felt like all my hard work for that year had finally paid off, beating the girl in finals in just 14 seconds.”

 

What honors/awards have you gotten (besides WCWA)?

“I was awarded Most Improved Wrestler my senior year in high school. In addition to winning the WCWA title, I was also awarded All-American. My sophomore year, I won 6th place at University Nationals. My current year, so far, I have been awarded 6th place at the Missouri Valley Open Tournament, 3rd place at the Bearcat Open, and [I] have been ranked 7th in the nation in the 123-pound weight class.”

 

What comes easiest to you as a wrestler?

“I have a natural athleticism and a disciplined mentality.”

What’s the hardest thing about being a wrestler? How do you deal with it?

“The hardest thing about being a wrestler is cutting out bad habits, such as soda, staying up late, drinking, and fatty foods. I train my body and my mind to overcome the temptations, and I surround myself with similar people that have to achieve these tasks.”

 

What makes it all worthwhile? What’s the greatest reward of wrestling for you?

“Making my family, friends, girlfriend and my coaches proud. The greatest reward of wrestling is building a rare character that will benefit me all my life. As a wrestler, you learn self-discipline, confidence, dedication, follow-through and determination.

 

Moving away from wrestling, how involved are you in school clubs? Which ones have you joined?

“Considering [that] wrestling is a job [in] itself and takes up so much of my time on top of schoolwork, I have been able to be involved in Spectrum Alliance. I have been a member for almost two years now and enjoy my time thoroughly.”

 

What’s your life plan after college? What do you want to do with your life?

“I would love to move back to the East Coast, where I would be working with the government as a federal profiler. I would also like to settle down and create a secure environment for me and my family to grow.”

 

What political/social issues do you care about?

 

Tell me your favorites (book, song, website, etc.).

 

OLIVIA INTERVIEW

OliviaSeppinni

What drew you to McKendree University?

“Wrestling, honestly, is what drew me to McKendree. When I visited, there was a homey, cozy vibe that I loved and hadn’t experienced at any college I had visited in the past. The sense of community was a big draw as well.”

 

What about the sense of community did you like?

“How welcoming everyone was during my recruiting trip when I was visiting. Everyone I came in contact with was excited to share information about McKendree. The hospitality was not something I was used to at home in California. There, the people are open-minded, but they aren’t always very friendly. California’s a place full of diversity, but I have found at McKendree different forms of diversity that I appreciate.”

 

Tell me more about California.

“I’m from Sacramento, and I live just three blocks away from the state capitol downtown. There, everything is in walking distance, and there are many easily accessible dining options and social opportunities. And it doesn’t snow. In fact, it rarely drops below 40 degrees, ever.”

 

How long have you been wrestling? Why did you start wrestling?

“I’ve been wrestling sine seventh grade; that makes it about eight years now. (It’s practically my life!) I joined wrestling because I was curious and I wasn’t involved in a sport at the time. So I thought, ‘Why not wrestling?’ I went out to the first practice and fell in love with the sport right away. I found my niche; something I was abnormally good at. And I was on the boys’ team until college.”

 

Tell me a highlight of your wrestling career.

“There are a lot of different highlights. Probably my top highlight has been making the Junior National Team (JNT). That was when I place second in the country for my age group (17-20 years old).”

 

What honors/awards have you gotten (besides JNT)?

  • Middle School State Champ 2008
  • California Freestyle State Title 2013
  • Competed at Junior Pan-American Championships in Toronto, 2014
  • 4th (all age groups), U. S. Open 2014; qualified for Senior World Team Trials
  • Currently ranked 7th in the country at senior level (all ages)

 

What comes easiest to you as a wrestler?

“I think being tactical and strategic—using my brain.”

 

What’s the hardest thing about being a wrestler? How do you deal with it?

“The intensity and nonstop grind of competing and training. I deal with it by getting enough sleep and eating vegetarian.”

 

What makes it all worthwhile? What’s the greatest reward of wrestling for you?

“I would say the satisfaction of making my loved ones proud. It’s not the only thing, but it’s up there.”

 

Moving away from wrestling, how involved are you in school clubs? Which ones have you joined?

  • Sophomore senator on SGA—finance committee
  • Spectrum Alliance—secretary
  • Student Ambassador—admissions office/tours
  • SAAC committee representative

 

What’s your life plan after college? What do you want to do with your life?

“I have two different possible life plans. The first one is to work in Human Resources. In fact, that’s what I’m studying—business major (HR emphasis) and leadership minor. Specifically, I want to work for a tech start-up in Silicon Valley or the Bay Area, but things can change. The other plan is to work for a college admissions office, or something along those lines. That’s my biggest goal—to make a difference in people’s lives.”

 

What political/social issues do you care about?

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The St. Louis Rams & the Stadium Issue

By Will Basler

Sports Editor

When the Los Angeles Rams moved to St. Louis in 1994, Stan Kroenke, a local billionaire, bought 40% ownership in the relocating franchise. Since then, Kroenke has accumulated a few franchises in the Denver area, including the NHL’s Avalanche, the NBA’s Nuggets and MLS’s Colorado Rapids. He is also the majority owner of one of the world’s biggest soccer clubs, Arsenal FC in England. He is estimated to be worth over $6 billion by Forbes. He has gained much of this fortune through real estate purchases and marrying into money, as his wife is the daughter of Sam Walton, an heir to the Walmart throne.

When longtime Rams majority owner Georgia Frontiere died in 2010, Kroenke bought out her shares and became the new majority owner of the team. The team he took over was in the middle of one of the worst on-field stretches in American sports history. The team was just 27-69 in the six years before. With this abysmal record, excitement surrounding the team was at an all-time low. Attendance and any merchandise sales followed suit. Rumors of the Rams moving to greener pastures started to spring up around the area.

The Edward Jones Dome, built in downtown St. Louis in 1995, was built with public money, in hopes of luring an NFL team to the city. It was paid for with public money and is owned by the city of St. Louis. The municipal bonds that paid for the stadium will not be paid off until 2021. The Rams and the city have a lease agreement where the dome must be in the top 15% of all NFL stadiums, or the team is allowed to look at relocation. In 2012, Time ranked the dome as the seventh-worst professional sports stadium in the U.S. It cited a lack of atmosphere, affordability and parking as to why it was rated so badly. At this point, the Edward Jones Dome was definitely not in the top 15% of NFL stadiums, so the franchise started to weigh their options.

On Jan. 31, 2014, both the Los Angeles Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that Stan Kroenke purchased approximately 60 acres of land adjacent near the LA Forum in Inglewood, Calif. for around $90 million to $100 million. As an NFL owner, any time land is purchased with the intent of building a stadium on it, the owner must notify the league office, and Kroenke did so. On Jan. 5, 2015, The Los Angeles Times reported that Stan Kroenke and Stockbridge Capital Group are partnering up in developing a new NFL Stadium on the Inglewood property owned by the Rams owner. The project will include a stadium of up to 80,000 seats and a performance venue of up to 6,000 seats while changing up the previously approved Hollywood Park plan for up to 890,000 square feet of retail, office space, residential units, a hotel and 25 acres of public parks, playgrounds, open space and pedestrian and bicycle access.

ramsThe construction of this stadium will cost around $1.86 billion and is planned to be built using no public funding. Kroenke and his partners at Hollywood Park Land Co. will provide much of the capital necessary to build the stadium. Even with this plan and the approval from local officials, there must be NFL approval to allow the team to move.

One thing the team will have to compete with in southern California will be sports teams and other forms of entertainment. For the Rams, especially after October, there are no real competitors for interest in the area. The Rams become the number one team in town from October until their season ends, which has recently been in December. In Los Angeles, the Rose Bowl and the Coliseum both house two historic college football teams. When USC and UCLA are at their best, they are competing for national titles and filling up their respective stadiums to the brim. With no major football programs in a two hour drive, this is something the Rams don’t have to worry about. Also in Los Angeles, there is an NBA presence that St. Louis doesn’t have, which will take citizens time and money away from supporting the Rams. The Lakers and Clippers have been in the city for years, and tickets can cost a pretty penny to attend games.

The race to Los Angeles does not come without competitors. The Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers, both upset with the way their home cities have treated them, have proposed building a stadium in nearby Carson, Calif. This offer has created some urgency on the part of Kroenke’s group, as time has now become of the essence.

Economically, the proposed stadium in downtown St. Louis on the riverfront makes a lot of sense. It is part of a revitalization of a dilapidated part of the city, the north riverfront. There are a number of old, rundown, inhabitable buildings that would be torn down in favor of a stadium complex that would include a huge parking lot for tailgating and game day atmosphere, both of which the stadium lacks currently. In the beginning of March, a group of economic officials told the Missouri House of Representatives that a new stadium in St. Louis could bring nearly $300 million in tax revenues to the state over the next 30 years. Taxes from NFL players alone in the state of Missouri were over $17 million – tax revenue the state would not see if the team moved away.

Relative to its Los Angeles counterpart, the St. Louis stadium would be built at a fraction of the cost. The new stadium, an open-air, 64,000 seat stadium would cost between $850 and $950 million, which is almost half of what its California rival would cost. A stadium task force, which was appointed by Missouri governor Jay Nixon, said there would be no new tax burden on the Missouri public. This plan would require about $200-$250 million from Kroenke, $200 million from the NFL’s G4 program (which is used to help fund new stadiums), and $300 million to $350 million from the possible extension of current bonds on the Edward Jones Dome which will expire in the next 10 years or so. This will be used along with the use of tax credits to build up the blighted area I referenced before, as well as the proceeds from the sale of personal seat licenses.

I think this team and the city of St. Louis have truly become synonymous over the last few years. The team hired Jeff Fisher, and with the hire, the team started to improve and play more exciting football. Attendance has responded, and this season the fans filled up the dome to 93% capacity. The Rams will compete for a playoff spot next year, and team support will follow. There is a huge movement in town to “Keep the Rams in STL” and the stadium plan turns doing so into a no-brainer for local citizens and legislators. The economics don’t lie, and the attendance and support that St. Louisans are throwing behind the team doesn’t either.

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Baseball Cats Look to Bounce Back After Slow Start

By Will Basler

Sports Editor

Over the weekend, McKendree hosted Missouri-St. Louis for a four game series – two games on Saturday, and two on Sunday. Saturday’s games ended up getting postponed due to field conditions, so the series became a Sunday-Monday series.

In the series opener, sophomore starting pitcher Jacob Renfrow gave up four runs in seven innings, and while the Cats cut the deficit to only one run, the Tritons from across the river scored to more to finish out the game and win 6-3.

In the second game of the series, Bearcat ace Sam Lidisky pitched six scoreless innings, and the lineup had the Bearcats up 2-0 going into the last inning. Leaving Lidisky on the mound for the last inning was a risk, and it certainly came back to bite the Bearcats. The tired southpaw gave up five runs (all earned, all in the seventh), and the Cats lost the second game 5-2. Scoring runs had been an issue thus far and when a team fails to provide a cushion for a pitcher, it can hurt them, as it did here.

On Monday, the Cats got swept again, although they probably shouldn’t have. Runs continued to be scarce in the first game, and they lost 5-1. In the second game, the bats came to life, scoring eleven runs, with two RBI days coming from senior 3B Jake Kline, junior SS Adam Kunkle and big sophomore 1B Zach Klockowski. However, in this instance, it was their pitching that failed them. The staff gave up thirteen runs, including three runs in the last inning. Senior closer Matt Sax only got to face one batter, a walk on eight pitches, which loaded the bases, and they were eventually cleared en route to another bearcat loss and the completion of a home sweep.

This weekend series was a microcosm of the young season for this team. They went down to Florida to play a nationally-ranked St. Leo team and got swept. They took only one of three from a Missouri S&T team that was picked to finish in the middle of the west division in GLVC’s preseason poll. They lost to NAIA team Harris Stowe in the midweek and finished it up with the sweep against UMSL. The struggling Bearcats sit at 1-8.

“I think we need to be more consistent. We’ve been a streaky team at the plate,” Senior closer Matt Sax explained. “Our pitching could be better too. An ERA around 4.00 is a good goal to achieve, and we aren’t there yet. (They are currently at 5.33) Then again, our fielding could improve as we’ve only turned one double play.” Sax really put it best, as consistency has kicked this team in the butt this season.

With two of the better players in the GLVC graduating last year, the returners needed to step up. The Bearcats have three four-year starters – 1B Jeff Tolliver, 3B Jake Kline, and CF Kyle Rutledge. This team is definitely a seasoned bunch, so they definitely have the right leadership in place to turn it around. Other seniors, including 2B Pierce Borah, the closer, Sax, Utilityman Jason Hobson and injured P Vince Kiefer all look to contribute to the Bearcat turnaround. Experience is certainly not something that this team lacks, which will definitely be key for them going forward.

Although their schedule offers them no breaks in the tough GLVC, this team is good enough to turn it around. All that is needed is for both sides of their game to come together at the same time. Like I stated earlier, when they are scoring runs, pitching doesn’t bring their A game. When the pitcher is performing, the offense leaves their bats at home. The Cats have a young pitching staff so look for them to improve as the season goes on. “We are really, really close to being a good team. We just need to play nine good innings,” senior Borah said. If the team can put it together, they are good enough to beat anyone on any given day.

I fully expect this experienced ball club to put their games together and hopefully improve enough to where they can make a run in the conference tournament. They have the talent to do so, as it will just be a matter of actually playing their game, like they have many times before.

Photo provided by mckbearcats.com

Photo provided by mckbearcats.com

Posted in Uncategorized

GLVC Men and Women’s Track

Photo provided by mckbearcats.com

Photo provided by mckbearcats.com

By Rebecca Mckee

Contributing Writer

Over two days, Feb. 28 and March 1, McKendree University’s men and women track and field teams competed in the GLVC Division II indoor championship meet. With 11 teams competing on both sides, the competition was tough, and our athletes competed to the best of their ability; many had shining moments in the placing’s and new personal bests were set.

Although there were no medals won on the girl’s team, we had some great showings by the athletes. There were multiple top showings to score us points as well as a lot of our girls posting new personal bests in their various events. In the 800 meters, Karis Johnson barely missed the medal with a fourth place finish and time of 2:20. In the 3,000 meters, Hannah Inyart was able to finish in sixth place with a time of 10:27. Our Distance Medley Relay, consisting of Christine Cunningham, Christine Ackermann, Karis Johnson and Hannah Inyart, ran an exciting race. Finishing in fourth place with a time of 12:32.61, they were able to set a new school record, and also beat their previous time by over twenty seconds. In the field events, two athletes rose to the occasion as they participated in the triple jump. Mollie Bowman took fifth with a distance of 10.87 m (35’8”), while Asaiah Hooks took sixth with 10.41m (34’2”). The women ended up tenth overall in the team competition. While it may not have been the finish we had hoped, all our women did the best effort they could put forward and we are excited to see where we can go from here.

The men’s team came out strong and had many athletes prove they are a force to be reckoned with in the conference. In the 60m dash, Deonte Andresen took fifth place with a time of 7.11 while CJ James ran a time of 6.82 and finished as the champion of the 60m. Earlier in the season, CJ ran a NCAA DII auto time of 6.73 to ensure him a place in the National Competition for the 60m in a few weeks. With this win in the 60m, it also gave McKendree its third consecutive 60m win in the indoor GLVC Championships. In the 200 m, Donovan Friscia finished in sixth with a time of 22.84 while James, again, landed a first place finish with a time of 22.16. James was able to call himself the fastest man in the GLVC with both the 60m and 200m wins. Our men’s 4×400 meter relay team, consisting of Grayson Horton, Alexis Palmer, Moses Randich and Christopher Jackson, also rose to the occasion, finishing in third place with a 3:25.28 finish. The athletes in the field events also gave great performances and high finishes. In the high jump, Alex McCrite took second while Eric Imel took third, both clearing the height of 2.00m (6’6.75”). They both went for the National Qualifying mark, but unfortunately both barely missed clearing the height. In the long jump, Deonte Andresen finished in sixth with a distance of 6.61m (21’8.25”). Then in the shot put competition, Ryan Pearce threw 15.92 m (52’2.75”) and landed himself in second place. The men finished the competition in sixth place and were able to show that they have more to give and we hope to see them do even more in the outdoor season.

Overall, the track team had a successful weekend in Indianapolis competing in the indoor Championships. With some strong finishes, the team was able to show how great our athletes are. While not everything went as planned, (i.e. the bus being stuck in the parking lot and the team needing to push it out of the snow before heading off to compete for day two) the meet ended successfully. Now the teams can prepare for outdoor to make new personal bests and strive for greater success.

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Puzzle Answers

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Gossip Girl Addiction

By Cheyenne Autry

Contributing Writer

It is the beginning of the first semester in college and all anyone can talk about is Netflix and their addiction. Many students use it for just movies or to pass time, but then you have the big majority who are just addicted. To what show you may ask? If you ask a majority of girls on campus their answer will be Gossip Girl, I am also one of these girls. What makes Gossip Girl so addicting? The drama and suspense between the characters and plot of each episode provides the perfect recipe for ultimate TV addiction.

Gossip Girl provides girls with the ultimate drama experience and a look into the elite life of New York. Every girl dreams of having a mother who is a designer, a life where all it takes is a snap of your finger, to be chauffeured through the city in a limo and for everyone to know your name. This TV show provides the experience of all this through the lives of Blair (Leighton Meester), Serena (Blake Lively), Chuck (Ed Westwick) and Nate (Chace Crawford). These four characters are the stars of New York, and everyone knows it. They have grown up with very wealthy families and enterprises. Without their families’ names, however they would be stuck in Brooklyn in a loft working for every dime, just as our new friend Dan (Pen Badgley). He is the son of a musician who did not quite make it in the 80’s but has worked every day of his life to provide the best education for his two kids.

IMDB Show Page

IMDB Show Page

Unlike the wealthy and privileged, Dan is almost invisible. He has to work to make a name for himself in society to ensure he makes it as a writer in an Ivy League college. This is until he finds his one and only, Serena. She is trying to start a new life and has grown a small crush on Dan, but will this ruin her reputation around New York? As soon as word gets around that Serena and Dan have been dating social media, Gossip Girl, starts raging. They are the center of attention at all times. Serena however, has a past and it will catch up with her.

As season 1 progresses Dan and Serena are happy and together, but Blair and Nate are not so happy. Nate has to live up to the reputation of his father’s legacy and help prolong his alliance with Blair’s mother by dating Blair. This is a fine until Nate realizes he does not truly love Blair. He seeks advice from his best friend Chuck who is a lonely man with money. Nate has lived his whole life allowing his father to tell him what to do, and Chuck persuades Nate to cut loose of the reigns and go out on his own. As Nate begins to leave the sheltered life of his father he realizes his father has an addiction, a drug addiction. Soon this addiction catches up and he finds himself in jail leaving Nate out all alone to face the social suicide of New York.

While Nate is defending his father’s name and deciding his love life, Serena’s past comes back to haunt her. Eventually karma strikes back and everything Serena has worked to fix is soon demolished simply by one girl, Georgina (Michelle Trachtenberg). This evil girl blackmails Serena to the point of no return. She is drove away from her beloved Dan and into the arms of her friends Blair, Nate and Chuck. Serena is forced to lie to Dan to secure her secret, but eventually that secret is revealed.

You may be sitting on the edge of your seat waiting for that secret, asking where Nate’s father is, wondering what happened to the love birds, or many other questions. This is just the beauty of the true suspense and addiction of the TV show. Why is this show so addicting you make ask, it is all in the unanswered questions in the story. While you sit and ponder upon your question I will continue live in my addiction into the elite of New York.

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[2014-2015: Vol. 93, Iss. 10] The Review Crew

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Vol. 93, Iss. 10

Editors

Emily Lucia
Editor-in-Chief

Donna Bick
Assistant Editor

Taquisha Drisdell
Assistant Editor 

Lauren Apetz
Media Editor

Editing Team

Emily Lucia
Donna Bick
Taquisha Drisdell

In This Issue

Donna Bick
Will Basler
Taquisha Drisdell
Janelle Jankowski
Jenna Morris
Maggie Mueller

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions,
which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in
Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at
701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
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“Ledditors” from the Editors

In this issue we feature many talented and interesting students and faculty. It was really a pleasure to read all of these amazing stories! Our stories range from a runner from Lithuania to someone who has worked on reality television as well as superstitions through sports and tips for running.

As always if you have questions or would like to submit an article you can email us at mckreview@mckendree.edu.

You can also find us on Facebook (facebook.com/themckendreereview) and Twitter (@mckreview).

Our next deadline is March 2nd.

Thank you for your continued support and happy reading!

Emily Lucia

Editor-in-Chief

Posted in Uncategorized

Miss Perfect

BY TAQUISHA DRISDELL, EDITOR

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Irma Maciukaite is from a small town in Pasvalys, Lithuania known as Sinkhole Park.  Maciukaite attended Petro Vileisio Gymnasium High school where she won the Lithuania championship as a senior.  After high school, she attended Western Kentucky University but decided to leave, because they cut her scholarship. After this misfortune, Agne Viscokaite-Eggerth, a 2002 McKendree graduate who is known as Mckendree University’s sprints record holder, and who is also an Olympian, told Maciukaite about McKendree and  what the track and field program offers. Maciukaite soon decided that she wanted to try it out for herself.  Currently, she attends McKendree University where she is majoring in Economics and Finance/Mathematics. Irma is also a part of the Track and Field program here at McKendree where she runs sprints and hurdles and is one of the top athletes on the squad. Since attending school at McKendree, Irma has earned the Academic All-GLVC honor, which, according to http://www.glvcsports.com, is given to student-athletes who have completed two semesters at their respective institutions and have maintained a 3.30 cumulative grade-point average or have attained a 3.40 GPA of the two most recent semesters. Irma is not only a beast on the track, but she takes her school work serious as

Irma Maciukaite

Irma Maciukaite

well. “I work hard on the track and in the class because I want to be the best at all I do.” Irma stated, “I came to McKendree University because I wanted to experience the United States. I love living in America and I hope to stay here and work or even get my master’s degree after I receive my undergraduate degree.”

Maciukaite started running track late in her life, but, so far, she has been running for ten years already, and hopes to go professional if finances and her job would allow her to, once she is done with college. Irma won Lithuania U23 championship in the 400 meter hurdles, got third place in 100 meter dash, and second place for North and Baltics State U23 championships in the 400 meter hurdles. When asked what was her most amazing accomplishment, she said with pride, that it was when she was at her high school graduation and was announced as Lithuania’s national champion for her favorite event; the 400 hurdles.

Maciukaite also spent one year in England, where she practiced on her own and got some help with a coach from home to better her athletic skills. She spent every day working harder and harder, practicing on a playground grass because she was determined to defend her title as a Lithuanian champion again. When Irma is finished at McKendree she is looking for the possibility to get her own work out program, as well as a facility that is a good enough place to have a work out system with coaches and athletes who are wonderful to work with. There are many athletes at McKendree that come from all over the world; Irma is just one of the many. It is always good to see others who come from different places and who are willing to share their stories and experiences with the people around them. Coming to the United States can be a bit scary and different, it’s a brave things for someone who came straight out of high school to another country to be on their own. Maciukaite is a very courageous individual to have come all this way to become a better person and to better herself in her track career. You can expect great things from Irma, because she is dedicated and her ambition will sure enough get her further in life and in her career as a McKendree student athlete.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Iss. 10, Sports

The Key to Victory

BY WILL BASLER, STAFF WRITER

Players and fans alike have their ways of avoiding bad luck. For fans, it may be sitting in the same spot you were sitting when your team won the big game. It may be wearing the same shirt you wore to work the day your favorite player got drafted. It may be not washing your clothes to avoid ruining your team’s winning streak. Whatever the fans may do, they are putting their faith in a higher power, doing whatever it takes to give their team a slight edge over the opponent. Players do the same thing. However, they may rely on a specific bat to get them that big hit, or wear the socks they wore when they beat their biggest rival. Whatever it may be, their intentions are the same as the fans. They are willing to do whatever it takes to help them win or just have a good game.

Superstitions happen at all levels of sports, from tee ball to the major leagues, and Pop Warner football to the NFL (National Football League).All ages are competitive and always try to find whatever might give them a step above their opponent. They may try a new haircut or wear wristbands in hope of getting that big hit or making a highlight catch. Do many athletes know that there is no direct help from a pair of batting gloves? Sure they do. It has to do with their comfort level. Sometimes it helps them focus. So in the end, these things do end up helping.

Many of the athletes here at McKendree have superstitions. Pierce Borah, the second-baseman on the baseball team who is leading the team in hitting, has a couple of superstitions. “I always wear the same undershirt if we are on a winning streak. If we lose, I switch it up until I find one that works.” Bearcat running back Ryan Herring says he makes sure to keep consistency in what he wears on game day. “I have to have the right socks or gloves. If I’m missing something like that, everything just feels off, and my mind just isn’t focused.” Superstitions can be key to success because they eliminate variables and help athletes focus.

Even the most famous, most talented athletes have superstitions. For example, Michael Jordan, who is widely-accepted as the greatest basketball player ever, wore his game shorts from his college years at North Carolina under his game shorts when he played for the Chicago Bulls. In baseball, stepping on the foul lines all but ruins your team’s chances that day. Mark McGwire, the former record-holding home run hitter for the St. Louis Cardinals, would often talk to his bat, asking “her” to hit a home run for him. Hall of Fame outfielder, Wade Boggs, who played for the Yankees, Red Sox, and Devil Rays, would eat chicken and ONLY chicken on game days. He did this for every game of his 18-year career.

Baseball is perhaps the sport one would think of most when thinking of superstitions, but superstitions are also very prevalent in golf. For instance, the most famous and arguably the best golfer of all time, Tiger Woods, wears a red golf shirt every Sunday during golf tournaments. He has done this because in 1996, when Tiger was just becoming a pro, his mom told him to wear red on the final day of a tournament because it was his “power color.” He ended up winning that tournament because of a great performance on Sunday. He has worn a red shirt on every tournament Sunday since then, and it has paid off; leading to the second-most PGA Tour wins, and the second-most major tournament titles. Every golfer has a lucky shirt or hat. I have a black Titleist-brand golf hat I have worn so much that it is turning gray. Some golfers have a lucky club or they always carry a certain arrangement of coins and tees in a certain pocket of their pants. Fishing, baseball, and golf are all very failure-oriented, and these superstitions are just trying to improve their chances at success.

Superstitions in sports are even portrayed in many movies. 1989s Major League displays many members of the Cleveland Indians worshipping and sacrificing to Jobu, a “baseball god”, in hopes of winning a big playoff game. In The Natural, the main character, the legendary Roy Hobbs, uses a lucky bat he made out of a tree when he was a boy. It was “the key” to hitting home runs for him. Superstitions are very famous around the world of sports, and athletes of all ages put their hopes in these crazy superstitions every day hoping to catch a break.

In the end, sports are the bridge between crazy and sanity. An outsider may see a baseball player doing a crazy hop to avoid the foul line and think, “Wow, what is that guy doing?” Any athlete knows that they don’t want to be a reason their team loses, and they believe that if the foul line gets stepped on, they aren’t going to win, losing all hope before the game even starts. These things may not actually make a difference, but if it makes a difference in the minds and bodies of the coaches and players, they’re going to keep doing them. At the end of the day any athlete will do whatever it takes to achieve victory.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Iss. 10, Sports

Chaos!

BY DONNA BICK, EDITOR

Dr. Greenfield's Office

Dr. Greenfield’s Office

Does this image to the left depict chaos? Yes, it does! But according to The Psychological Meaning of Chaos: Translating Theory into Practice, “[c]haos is seen as a healthy and essential part of the creation process.” Despite his chaotic surroundings, Dr. Greenfield has a mind like an organized rolodex when it comes to the stimulating topics he teaches. His repertoire includes topics in many different genres, such as: Romantic Literature, Victorian English Literature, and World Literature. He also instructs the Nature of

Dr. Greenfield

Dr. Greenfield

Language course, English Grammar as well as Honors courses and General literature courses. Do not let this threatening, menacing, and overwhelming stockpile to seemingly nowhere scare you; in it are shelves, rows, and heaps of English language learning texts, English language origin and transformation books, videos, and learning tools as well as novels, short stories, and poetry of brilliant authors’, literature masterpieces stockpiled on the floor and shelves behind the accomplished, brilliant, and creative mind of Dr. Greenfield.

Dr. Greenfield received his bachelor’s, masters and doctoral degree at Indiana University. He won the Exemplary Teaching Award in 2002-2003 from the United Methodist Higher Education Board; he is the advisor to the National English Honors Society; Sigma Tau Delta; has edited five volumes in Dictionary of Literary Biography Series and two volumes of The Dictionary of British Literary Characters; has published several journal articles and presented numerous conference papers on nineteenth century English writers. His teaching philosophy states that he enjoys working with interesting and motivated students at McKendree University and Dr. Greenfield has been doing this for over twenty years. One can honestly say that Dr. Greenfield is WELL READ!

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Iss. 10

Give Big to the Pig

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What is Give Big to the Pig?

Give Big to the Pig is a fun way for McKendree students, faculty and staff to share in the spirit of philanthropy. Besides being a cool keepsake, the purple pigs make it easy and painless to give a little something back – in a feel good and fun way to McKendree University.

How do I participate?

Fatten your pig. Feed them occasionally. They’re not picky – a steady diet of
pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and
dollar bills work! Then, bring your pig to any of our Purple Pig Roundups throughout the year.

Need a Purple Pig?

Purple Pigs are plentiful! Just email us at
alumni@mckendree.edu or call (618) 537-6823. We will happily send one your way!

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Campus Advertisements, Campus Events, Iss. 10

Senior Class Gift

 

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Senior Class Gift- The What. The Why.

The Senior Class Gift (SCG) encompasses a proud tradition of senior classes making a gift to McKendree University’s Annual Fund. Every graduating class member is asked to make a gift of $20.15 in support of their alma mater.

Top 6 Reasons Why You Should Make your Senior Glass Gift.

  1. Every time a senior makes their gift, Bogey jumps for joy.
    Making your Senior Class Gift is the ultimate embodiment of school spirit. Your gift shows you are proud to be a Bearcat and committed to supporting the future of your alma mater.
  2. You get a free t-shirt. That should be reason enough.
    Make a gift, get a free t-shirt. It is as simple as that. These highly coveted SCG t-shirts will be the envy of all your underclassmen friends and classmates. Wear them often to help inspire other Seniors to make their gifts.
  3. Giving back to the University makes you feel good.
    Just like the Seniors that came before you, you are paying it forward to future McKendree graduates. Give yourself a pat on the back! Making the decision to make a gift that makes a difference is something that you should be very proud of.
  4. It’s easy.
    Making your Senior Class Gift is quick and easy. Just visit our website www.mckendree.edu/scg and click on the Make A Gift Now button. Enter all required information and BOOM, you are done. You can also come in person to the Alumni House or find us at one of the SCG events throughout the year.
  5. Say “Thank You” to McKendree for an amazing four years.
    Graduation will be here before you know it! We hope that as you are nearing the end of your time at McKendree University, you are looking back at the last four years with fond memories. What better way to say “Thank You” for all of the experiences you have had, the friends you have made, and the opportunities now within your reach. Your Senior Class Gift shows your appreciation for McKendree and all that it has meant to you.
  6. Once a Bearcat, always a Bearcat.
    Your decision to make a Senior Class Gift makes a statement. It is not only a statement of appreciation but also of support. It is not only a statement of pride but also of commitment. By making a gift, you and your fellow seniors are playing a vital role in the history of the University. Walking across the stage in May does not end your relationship with McKendree, it is only the beginning. Go BEARCATS!
Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Campus Advertisements, Iss. 10

Bringing Service into the Classroom

Mckendree.edu

Neil Quisenberry

BY JENNA MORRIS & MAGGIE MUELLER, STAFF WRITERS

Community service plays a large role at McKendree University.  Many students are actively involved with the Lyn Huxford Center for Community Service (CCS) and take time out of there busy schedules to give back to our community.   One way that McKendree also gets students involved is by having service learning in the classrooms.  According to the CCS website, service learning is, “a method under which students learn and develop through thoughtfully organized service”.

Many professors at McKendree use service learning in their courses.  Neil Quisenberry, 12-year Professor of Sociology at McKendree has just begun using service learning in his sociology classes after coworker Lyn Huxford retired.  Quisenberry says, “This is my first time doing it, so I’m still learning the best way to do it for sociology classes.”

Dr. Quisenberry likes the idea of service learning because it gets the students out into the community and out of the classroom, “Teachers need to get students out into the filed whether it’s service learning, internship, or a co-op.” In Dr. Quisenberry’s sociology class service learning is done outside of class along with a reflection on what students have learned from their experience.

Service learning can be seen as different than just simply volunteering.  Dr. Quisenberry gives his own interpretation of what the difference between service learning and volunteering are.  “Volunteering is doing something for others in your community, while service learning is the same, but you understand it on a deeper context because you are learning about it in class.”  He believes that it makes the material covered in class seem more real and students are able to take what they learn in the classroom and apply it to the real world.

Service learning is a great way to help our students get involved in our community, and also give them real world experience on how their major can be used in volunteering.  It is a win-win opportunity for students and professors at McKendree.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus Announcements, Iss. 10, Uncategorized

Running Corner

BY TAQUISHA DRISDELL, EDITOR

Theme of the Week: Aerobic Endurance                                                             

The topic on every runner’s mind, whether you’re a casual or competitive runner, is how does one build Aerobic Endurance? Every runner who competes in a local 5k or who enjoys getting out on the road, wants to know the answer to that question, “How do I run longer?”

Science of the Week                                                     

The body uses oxygen to convert nutrients such as fat and carbohydrates during aerobic endurance work. It’s important to understand that at max aerobic velocity, you can only maintain that pace for the aerobic energy system for about 8-10 minutes. The closer you are to 100% output within this system (i.e., 6min pace), the quicker you will “hit the wall” and forget any personal bests you intended on setting (over 10 minutes of running). As you decrease pace (98% 6:08, 96% 6:15), you will be able to maintain that effort for a longer period of time. Finally, you cannot get away from it, the more you run, the better you’ll get! Do it smart and do it progressively. Your body will adapt to the stimulus you present it. Challenge yourself! Your heart will get stronger and thicker. Your body will begin to produce more capillaries to transport oxygen and it will create more red blood cells, too!

Running Tip of the Week                                                            

Aerobic endurance training is all about being patient! It takes about 40 days to adapt to your training! That means you must train often and frequently to see real gains. There are no shortcuts but you will only get there by continuous training cycles and good, healthy recovery habits. Get your sleep and get your nutrients replaced. Running tip of the week: STAY CONSISTENT and find ways you CAN, not reasons you can’t.

Workout of the Week                                                  

There is no better time than now to get on a treadmill and hammer some threshold repeats! Threshold is the pace you can maintain for about 20 minutes, or about 88% VO2 MAX. If your VO2 MAX pace were 6 minutes per mile, you could run for 20 minutes at around 6:44 pace (give or take). The work out is this: Begin with 4×3 minutes at threshold with 3 minutes jogging rest on the treadmill. So that is 3 minutes at 6:44, 3 minutes at around 8 minutes and then repeat FOUR times. The following week, do 5. Increase every week or every other week until you can do 8-10 repetitions. Once you move up to 8-10, start back over at 4 but increase your pace by 4-8 seconds per mile!

Healthy Meal of the Week                                                        

You’ve got to refuel! Best snack to have after a workout/run is chocolate milk. After an aerobic workout you will be most deficient in liquids and, if you did it correctly, you will have used oxygen to convert both fat and carbohydrates (along with protein) as an energy sources throughout your run. The meal of the week is Pasta with Pork as flavoring and plenty of red sauce with a side of salad.

Problem of the Week                                                   

Running related injuries are rampant amongst long distance runners. Think about this: during the average run (6miles at 8min pace) individuals will take between 8 and 10,000 steps. If your body is imbalanced by even 1%, multiply that difference over 10,000 steps… no good. Depending on your force application, you will impact the ground between 5 and 8 times your body weight each step! At 160lbs, 1% is 1.6lbs… multiplied by 10,000 steps… that’s 16,000lbs! And then we wonder why something hurts on one side of our body! Take care of your body and be symmetrical. STRENGTH HELPS!

Mindset of the Week                                                   

Aerobic training is mental training. The next time you’re out and about or running on the treadmill, pay attention to your inner conversation. I promise that the sooner you address the negative thoughts that enter EVERYONE’S mind, the sooner you’re going to have a more enjoyable and productive experience. Try this mantra: “I can, I will.”

Have a fitness question? Each week TaQuisha Drisdell sits down with the coach and prepares for our next issue. Please email her to get your question answered!

We’ve had some interest for a “running clinic.” If there is enough interest, the coach will lead a short clinic and be available to answer many running-related questions! Please email TaQuisha to have your interest noted!

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Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Advice, Articles, Iss. 10

A.L.P.H.A.- A Great Organization!

BY DONNA BICK, EDITOR

Once again the ladies of A.L.P.H.A., also known as Amazing Ladies Pursuing Holistic Appreciation are in full swing. Several ladies turned out to at their latest meeting see who would be the new President of A.L.P.H.A. and Denise Adams-Jones was elected. CONGRATULATIONS! Denise Adams-Jones is a Health and Wellness Major here at McKendree University and you can see her in between classes at 1828 where she works part-time. For those of you that are new to campus, A.L.P.H.A. is a registered student organization (RSO) comprised of mainly African American females, but males as well as ALL ethnicities, both male and female, are welcomed and highly encouraged to attend meetings and group events. Jessica Fort, who has since graduated, was on hand to offer friendly advice for the newly elected President and to promote this caring and friendly group.

The women of A.L.P.H.A. are known as a group of intelligent, compassionate ladies who are there for each other to help a fellow sister with the many trials that come with life for the African American female and to help with the many difficulties and struggles that come with being a college student. What exudes from this group is friendship, camaraderie, fellowship, advice and so much more. If this sounds like something you would be interested in, then join this group of ladies and make lasting friendships. Here are a few names of the ladies present at this meeting: Deshawnta Houston, Aimee Dancy, Lauren Reeves, Jessica Fort, Shanell Griffin, Rhoda Warner, Azieonnia Snow, Payton Harris, Denise Adams-Jones, Abby Lowman, and ,of course, Mrs. Clarissa Melvin.

One issue discussed at the A.L.P.H.A. meeting was that Rhoda Warner received a grant from the United Way that she intends to use for a health-fair related event in PAC that will exhibit topics such as breast cancer, diabetes, high cholesterol, and other health issues. If interested in this issue or helping out, talk to Rhoda Warner. After meeting Rhoda for the first time at this meeting, she definitely exudes knowledge, confidence, approachability, and friendliness; these are just a small fraction of character traits you will find in an A.L.P.H.A. member.

Lauren Reeves, who looks suspiciously like Brent Reeves, Head of Student Affairs, (hmmm…I wonder if they are related) mentioned team-building and recruitment for the A.L.P.H.A. organization. Clearly the A.L.P.H.A. organization has focus and a healthy desire to reach out to other campus ladies who would like to be part of something honorable and uplifting.

A.L.P.H.A.’s next meeting is scheduled for March, 19th at 5PM in the Clark Lounge. You don’t want to miss it.

 

 

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Campus Organization, Iss. 10, Uncategorized

[2014-2015: Vol. 93, Iss. 9] The Review Crew

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Vol. 93, Iss. 9

Editors

Emily Lucia
Editor-in-Chief

Donna Bick
Assistant Editor

Taquisha Drisdell
Assistant Editor 

Lauren Apetz
Media Editor

Editing Team

Emily Lucia
Donna Bick
Taquisha Drisdell

In This Issue

Donna Bick
Lauren Apetz
Will Basler
Morgan Roscow
Ronnie Drummond
Jennifer Blumberg
Kendra Barackman
Lafayette Waters

The McKendree Review is a student-run organization of McKendree University. The mission of The McKendree Review is to give students the opportunity to learn the news process and publish articles pertaining to their opinions and ideas.

The staff does not agree with all statements and opinions,
which rightfully belong to their writers.

The McKendree Review Office can be found in
Eisenmayer 208 on the McKendree Campus, at
701 College Rd., Lebanon, IL, 62254.

Staff can be reached by email at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Iss. 9, McKendree Review Issues

[Issue 9] “Ledditors” from the Editors

It really was an honor to collect, read and edit all of these article for this 2nd Issue of the Spring 2015 semester. All the articles were well written and told wonderful stories.

In this issue you will see a feature on Belinda McAllister, an alumni whose family ancestry dates back 100 years in Lebanon, Il.  as well as a movie review for the recent Blockbuster, American Sniper, and many more.

As usual you can send your articles and questions to us at mckreview@mckendree.edu.
You can also find us on social media: On Twitter @mckreview, and on Facebook at facebook.com/mckendreereview.

We thank you for your continued support! Happy reading!

Emily Lucia
Editor-In-Chief

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Iss. 9, Letters from the Editors, McKendree Review Issues

[Issue 9] A History and Life in Lebanon – Belinda McAllister

BY MORGAN ROSCOW, STAFF WRITER

Lebanon is known as a place that is rich in history, which is far more advanced than the rest of the country in regards to the relations between ethnicities. When segregation was happening, Lebanon was a free town.

According to Belinda McAllister (right), whose family is from Lebanon and has a very

Belinda McAllister

Belinda McAllister

historical background in the town, in 1814 while the rest of the country was in the depths of slavery in Lebanon, blacks and whites could own land and businesses. This was extremely radical for that time period, since just a few years later in Florida in 1817 slaves and Native Americans fought against Andrew Jackson in the First Seminole War (pbs.org).

McAllister said that there were only two places in town that were segregated. That included the first 4 rows at The Looking Glass Playhouse, closest to the stage by the exit, and the soda shop/pharmacy. At the soda shop, blacks could come in and get soda or medicine, but they could not sit down. Whether or not they could not sit down, the fact is that at in this time period of time blacks and whites could be in the same place at the same time, without complete segregation, is profound.

Belinda McAllister grew up in Lebanon. She knows it like the back of her hand, and her family has a long history in Lebanon, living here for at least 100 years, and has even has a role in nationally history. In an interview, McAllister said she is of mixed decent, her mother being German with blond hair and blue eyes, and her father being African American. Her great grandfather built a 3 bedroom home, owned land and farmed in this

The McAllister House

The McAllister House

town 100 years ago on 513 McAllister Street (left).

Her great grandmother’s aunt, Mamie Turner Rhodes, born June 22, 1874, was the first African American woman to graduate from McKendree in 1895. E-yearbook.com says “Her parents are Young and Mary Turner, who are both American born. They were both slaves before the Civil war. She became a student in McKendree in Sep-tember, 1891, and graduated in June, 1895.”

Both McAllister Street and the McAllister Playground, located at the corner of Prairie Cherry Streets, are named after her grandfather. According to McAllister, Martin Luther King’s idea for the Equal Opportunity Centers derived from her grandfather. He started the NOC in Lebanon and when King came through town, he liked the idea and took it on to a national level.

Not only has her grandfather been a huge uncredited part of national history, McAllister herself has been a part of McKendree history that is continuing to this day. With the help of Dr. Huxford, she started what was known as Students Against Social Injustice (SASI), which eventually emerged with The Center for Public Service, recently renamed The Lyn Huxford Center for Community Service (CCS). She says that at the time SASI and The Center for Public Service was a huge part of the campus, hardly any student was not a part of either one or both, or the organizations.

After starting SASI and being a big role on McKendree’s campus, she had two huge

During the Interview

During the Interview

opportunities given to her: she could either take the scholarship she worked for and study at Cambridge in England, or take the job offer from Habitat for Humanity. She decided to take the job with Habitat for Humanity so that she could go help others, and sold almost all of her things on Dr. Huxford’s lawn to get the money to go to Jamaica, where she eventually became a dual citizen.

Her life has been full of service to others. With her degree being in Sociology-Criminal Justice, she worked at Hoyleton Youth and Family Services through Hoyleton Ministries. Her current occupation is in Miami, where she works as an on call case worker, which is where she is called if there is an at risk situation. She goes to the home and connects in some way with the person/family and helps to defuse the situation and get the person/family help. She is currently looking to move back to the Lebanon area to be with family.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Features, Iss. 9, Local/Campus News, McKendree Review Issues, News

[Issue 9] There’s No Place Like Home

BY LAUREN APETZ, MEDIA EDITOR

A majority of the McKendree University student body is from around the area and can go home whenever they like. But for a lot of students, going home takes more than just a short car ride. For the likeness of this article, Missouri and Illinois are considered “in-state”.

There is a high population of athletes on campus, and a majority of these athletes are brought in from out of state, even out of the country. There are certain teams that are known as teams who recruit out of state and even more–out of the country. If someone on campus is from out of the country, then they are most likely either a tennis player or a soccer player.

I myself am an out-of-state student from Florida, so I was curious how my fellow students who are out-of-state share some of the same problems I do. I don’t have a car, and I don’t get to go home all that often, only for the major breaks like Christmas and summer. Not having a car here is a huge struggle. I am not the only one who feels this way.

Aleix Alvarez

Aleix Alvarez

“It’s kind of impossible to live here if you don’t have car cause the distances between places are so long and always have to ask friends for doing something out school or just go buy groceries.” ~ Aleix Alvarez

Aleix is a tennis player who is here from Barcelona, Spain. A lot of his friends are also from out of the country so the chances of them having a car are pretty slim as well. Aleix will walk from West to campus a lot because Bogey doesn’t run on schedule most of the time. People definitely take having a car for granted. Scott Armistead, a goalie from New Zealand, says that not having a car really isn’t an issue because all of his roommates have cars so they either take him places or they allow him to borrow their car. Shawn Bibee, a bowler from Detroit states, “It’s not always the easiest thing trying to find ways into town to get groceries, to practice since we have to commute a bit, or my leagues that travel in other cities. I guess you could say it’s limiting as to what I can actually do.” There are a lot of out of state students who do have cars and drove them for hours to get them here so that they don’t feel stranded. Yes, you can walk places, but when it is really cold and snowy, do you really want to be walking to class?

No one that I interviewed had any regrets about going away from home to go to

Shawn Bibee

Shawn Bibee

school, they just miss certain things that come with living close to home. Little things like peoples’ birthdays or miss chances to see younger relatives grow up. Another thing to miss about home is that when you are sick, mom can’t just hop in a car and come take care of you. Being away from home forces the individual to mature and grow up a little faster than the ones who either live at home or who has the opportunity to go home all the time.

“Regrets for going away from home? I don’t get to see my loved ones but it’s made me a completely independent person when it comes to decision making and having to back myself. I’ve grown apart from a lot of my friends back home that went to local/in-state schools but that’s–I guess–that’s a price you pay when you want to provide a better chance for your future.”- Shawn Bibee.

“Although I really miss my family at times, it has allowed me to mature, learn, meet new people, and expand my connections.”- Riley Smith bowler from Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Jeremy Baldyga

Jeremy Baldyga

“I don’t have any regrets leaving home to come to school here. I really like McKendree and the way it’s set up. Learning is easy, sports are fun, the people are incredible, and it is honestly everything I wanted to find in my search for a school!”- Jeremy Baldyga soccer player from Denver, Colorado.

Life for the out-of-state student can be a little bit more difficult but coming to McKendree University has been well worth the hours of travel and the hundreds of “You’re from _____, why the hell are you in Illinois?”

 

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Iss. 9, Local/Campus News, McKendree Review Issues, News

[Issue 9] McKendree Takes 5th Place at Webster University

BY JOE BLASDEL, SPEECH AND DEBATE COACH

McKendree University finished in 5th place in overall program sweepstakes at Webster University’s Gorlok Gala and took home 21 individual awards. Fifty colleges and universities, including Boise State University, Washington University, and Ohio State University, attended the tournament on January 23-25. Representing McKendree were seniors Rebecca Blake, Josh Fleming, and Spencer Marcum; juniors Lauren Apetz and Quinn McRoberts; sophomore Katie Reining; and first-years Alex Baldwin, Austin Brown, Emeri Farnam, Beth Graham, Brett Hanna, David Junge, Adam Kaul, Jode Luster, Briar North, Ariel Rodriguez, Gage Simmons, and Hannah Zickefoose.

“The team really came through this weekend,” said Stephen Hagan.  “In particular, our first-year students had excellent showings and really grew as performers.”

In individual events, Marcum advanced to elimination rounds in five events. He placed 4th

Speech Team

Speech Team

in prose and 5th in drama, while finishing as a semifinalist in poetry. In addition, the duo of Blake and Marcum won 1st place in duo, while Marcum and Reining took 2nd in improvisation. Blake also finished as a semifinalist in drama and in 5th place in improvisation with Fleming. Fleming won 3rd place in programmed oral interpretation and reached semifinals in prose. Zickefoose took 5th place and top novice in programmed oral interpretation, while receiving an excellent award in impromptu. North reached semifinals in impromptu as well as taking top novice and an excellent award in informative. Farnam reached semifinals in both prose and persuasion. Blake took 3rd place in individual sweepstakes, while McKendree took 4th place in individual event sweepstakes.

In open parliamentary debate, the team of Baldwin and Simmons posted a 4-1 record. After receiving a bye in the double-octofinal round, they lost to William Jewell College and finished in 9th place. In novice Lincoln-Douglas debate, Baldwin went 4-2. After defeating Hillsdale College in quarterfinals, he lost to Sterling College to finish as a semifinalist. Baldwin also took 4th speaker in the division.

Finally, McKendree qualified two more events for nationals. Fleming qualified for the American Forensic Association National Individual Events Tournament in programmed oral interpretation, while Baldwin and Simmons qualified for the National Parliamentary Tournament of Excellence.

McKendree will next compete at the Jackson Purchase Swing, hosted by Murray State University, on February 7-8.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Campus Organization, Iss. 9, Local/Campus News, McKendree Review Issues, News

[Issue 9] Summer Internships: Paying to work for Free?

BY LAUREN APETZ, MEDIA EDITOR

I recently took a summer internship through McKendree to work at a local news station in Orlando, Fl. I loved the idea because I would then be close to home and could enjoy a hot Florida summer, but I became worried when I was told none of my scholarships would cover the cost. I was floored when I learned how much money I had to pay to take a three credit level internship. I had to pay the University $2,000 just to get the internship. I had to pay the two grand just so I could work for free. This system seems a little backwards to me. I get that there has to be a professor “on the job” to oversee our progress to make sure that we are doing the work, but the work I had to do for the professor was not worth $2,000 worth of my time. I had to send in a summary at the end

Google Images

Google Images

of the week about what I did at the internship over the week. Then at the end of the internship I had to write a four page paper about my experience in the workplace. I do not feel like the amount of work that the professor had to do was not worth $2,000 of my money. On top of the money I had to pay the university, I also had to pay money for things like clothes for the internship and money for transportation. These things all add up just so I can go work for free. I do not regret taking this internship at all, though, because I had the best time of my life and made some priceless connections that will help me land my dream job as a sports broadcaster. I think the price for taking an internship over the summer should be dropped drastically. It is hard enough to pay for my schooling semester to semester, so paying for the internship wasn’t the easiest either. If the price of the internship was even closer to $1,000, I wouldn’t have felt so bad. I am honestly just curious as to how me working for someone else is worth me paying $2,000.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Features, Iss. 9, McKendree Review Issues, Opinion

[Issue 9] Donna’s Profiles: Taquisha Drisdell and Kennon Henderson

Taquisha Drisdell

Taquisha Drisdell

Name: Taquisha Drisdell
Major: Theater/Journalism
Favorite Professor: Gabe Shapiro
Year: Junior

What do you like best or least about Valentine’s Day?
What I like least about Valentine’s Day is that everyone treats it likes that’s the only day they have to express their love, when if you really love someone you should show them that you do all year around not just one day out of the year.
What is the greatest constructive criticism you have received from a supervisor?
The greatest constructive criticism I’ve received from a supervisor was that I’m an extremely hard worker. And the way I learn quickly is wonderful because it gives me the ability to move up in the business quicker than others.
Tell me about one thing that is unique or remarkable about you?
One thing that is unique about me is that I love to take pictures. I can be having the worst day ever, but I would still whip my phone out to take pictures of myself. I think this habit is unique because not everyone is photogenic.
What are your career goals?
My career goal is to be a news anchor or take on any job that allows me to be in front of the camera. I enjoy being in front of the camera and inform and entertain people so I think that will be the perfect career for me.
What was the last book you read, and what impact did it have on you?
The last book I read was “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare. This isn’t so much a book but the script of the play. It led me into wanting to watch the film. It didn’t have too much of an impact on me, but t informed me on how strong love can be.
What kind of hobbies and activities do you enjoy in your spare time?
In my spare time I enjoy going shopping and hanging out my friends. I can hardly do this so when I’m able to, it makes me happy and stress free.
What do you see yourself doing five years from now?
In five years from now I see myself working in California or Atlanta for one of the top radio or news stations. I say this because this is what I’m really working towards and if I put my ALL into it, I will make it.
What have you learned from your participation in extra-curricular activities?
By being a part of many different track and field programs I’ve learned how to have patience and the importance of team work. I’ve learned how to be a people’s person because being friendly will get you far in life. Being an athlete has taught me to be strong and even when I feel like giving up you should continue to push through it.

Name: Kennon Henderson

Kennon Henderson

Kennon Henderson

Major: Sociology- Criminal Justice
Favorite Professor: Dr. Hagan
Originally from:
Year: Sophomore

What do I like most or least about Valentine’s Day?
My least favorite thing about Valentine’s Day is the fact that I am in a long distance relationship, however I love the flowers and chocolate that he sends. :)

Give me an example of how you have shown initiative in a situation and what resulted.
After finding out last week my boyfriend’s mother has a basketball sized cancerous tumor, I took the initiative to gather the facts, and construct a story about her to create a “gofundme” page where people could donate towards the cost of her surgery, appointments, medical bills, etc. The result? It was incredible. It has been 5 days today that the page has been up and $5867 has been raised.

What kinds of things do you do to motivate the people that you work with?
The people I work with are my teammates on the women’s wrestling team here at McKendree. Motivation in a sport like wrestling is a must. I often send texts to keep people motivated. If I notice someone is down on themselves I talk to them, try to make them laugh. Lastly I always encourage people to find the positives. In life we face a lot of negatives, but if you are able to find the positives in the negatives it makes life that much easier.

What kind of hobbies and activities do you enjoy in your spare time?
When I am not wrestling I enjoy going to movies, eating, and relaxing.

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?
Not sure what kind of job I will have, but I see myself living in Texas, and coaching wrestling.

What have you learned from your participation in extra-curricular activities?
I have learned four big things. 1. How to be a part of a team 2. Champions always find a way 3. Life is 85% mental. 4. Always look for the positives

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Campus, Features, Iss. 9, McKendree Review Issues, Uncategorized

[Issue 9] Greek Fire: A Concert Review

BY RONNIE DRUMMOND, STAFF WRITER

On Saturday January 24, 2015, my girlfriend, Kaitlyn Spires, and I attended our first Greek Fire Concert. Before I get into my review let me give you a brief background of the band. Greek Fire is a local band from St. Louis. In 2008, Greek Fire began, with four guys; Philip “Moon” Sneed (Lead Vocals), Ryan Phillips (Lead Guitarist), Mark “Giant Rubber Fist” Roth (Bass & Backup Vocals), and Johnny Venus (Drums). Moon is one of the

Google Images

Google Images

producers of The Rizzuto Show (Previously Woody & Rizzuto Show) on 105.7 The Point. I have been a long time listener of the morning shows on 105.7 The Point, but I was able to increase my listening time tremendously last semester due to my class schedule. Upon the countless hours on listening, I learned about Greek Fire and that Moon was a part of the band. Throughout the semester I dragged Kaitlyn to many different Point events that varied from haunted houses to mattress warehouses. We began to get to know the four producers of The Rizzuto Show (Scott Rizzuto, Tony Patrico, Jeff Burton, and Moon) along with another DJ for The Point, “Lux”. For a Christmas present, I asked Moon to have his band sign a CD for me as a present to Kaitlyn. Finally, I received word of the Greek Fire concert and knew I had to attend, so I purchased tickets to the Greek Fire concert at The Ready Room venue in St. Louis, Missouri.

The show started at 8:00 P.M., doors open at 7:00 P.M.; however Kaitlyn and I wanted to get a good spot to stand since The Ready Room is not consisted of seats, but rather spots to stand based upon arrival so we arrived at 5:00 P.M. Eventually we got in and were about to snag front and center spots. After a surprisingly good opening act by a smaller local band from St. Louis, Pistols and The Sisters, Greek Fire came out. The venue was packed and was a little uncomfortable at first, but we were both excited to experience our first Greek Fire concert. After the first song, the whole mood changed. The excitement was still just as strong; however it began the start of the story that came along throughout the night. After the first song, Moon started talking about how proud Greek Fire was to be from St. Louis and how they had a special connection between the fans in which made them feel like one big family. With that little speech, the venue became a little less uncomfortable and they played another song. Moon talked about how the band has been all over the globe and that they were so proud to be from St. Louis and how they wanted every venue that they performed at to know Greek Fire was from St. Louis so they would bring the St. Louis flag to every venue.

As the night progressed Moon gave another speech about how St. Louis can all come together with the power of music as one big family and that is exactly what happened. The songs continued to play and the audience were able to connect and come together by singing and dancing to the music. It honestly was an incredible experience, the venue was a union of Greek Fire fans coming together to enjoy this concert. The band members tried to interact with the audience, especially Moon. Moon would periodically come into the audience while singing. He danced with the crowd and at one point he got on a random person’s shoulders. It really added to the feeling that everyone is in this “family” that he would continue to talk about.

This concert was beyond amazing, if alternative rock is a genre that you, the reader, enjoys, I highly recommend checking out Greek Fire. Their most recent accomplishment is having one of their songs, ‘Top of The World’ featured in a promotional trailer for the

Google Images

Google Images

movie, Big Hero Six. If cost of tickets is something that may concern you, have no worry because the tickets were $15.00 each. The band still has not signed with a record label, but the new accomplishment has really given the good publicity they need to bring them to the next level. The quality of the music exceeded what it sounds like on the radio, it was extremely fantastic. I give this band the best review and highest recommendation possible. Tune into 105.7 The Point or go on their website to look for upcoming shows, if you like alternative rock, you will not be disappointed. http://www.1057thepoint.com/ This is the link to their website.

Posted in 2014-2015: Vol. 93, Articles, Entertainment, Iss. 9, McKendree Review Issues